Biography

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Biography Category
Detail of Biography - Eugene Gladstone O’Neill
Name :
Eugene Gladstone O’Neill
Date :
Views :
626
Category :
Birth Date :
16/10/1888
Birth Place :
New York.
Death Date :
NOVEMBER 27, 1953
Biography - Eugene Gladstone O’Neill
O’Neill was always "feeling alone, and above, and apart". He considered himself "a stranger who never feels at home" and assumed that he "is not really wanted".[br /]
[br /]


About his stay at the Gaylord Sanatorium, he said "My mind got the chance to establish itself, to digest and evaluate the impressions of many past years in which one experience had crowded on another with never a second’s reflection. At Gaylord, I really thought about my life for the first time, about past and future. Undoubtedly the inactivity forced upon me by the life at the Sanatorium forced me to mental activity, especially as I had always been high-strung and nervous temperamentally."[br /]
[br /]


"I kept writing because I had such a love of it. I was highly introspective, intensely nervous and self-conscious. I was very tense, I drank to overcome my shyness ---- when I was writing, I was alive."[br /]
[br /]


Frank Best – "O’Neill was never a bum nor a borrower. He frequented the haunts of bums and seamen seeking true facts."[br /]
[br /]


Muriel McComber – "He was delightful, lots of fun, and we had good times together, --- Eugene never discussed his family with me".[br /]
[br /]


Clayton Hamilton, "He had large and dreamy eyes, a slender, somewhat frail and yet athletic body, a habit of silence, and an evident disease of shyness."[br /]
[br /]


Judge Frederick P Latimer, "There was something in Eugene, at that time, an innate nobility which inspires and drives a man, against whatever hindrance, to be himself, however heaven or hell conspires to rob him of that birthright."[br /]
[br /]


Judge Fredrick P Latimer, "The four things about him that impressed me, at once, were his modesty, his native gentlemanliness, his wonderful eyes, and his literary style."[br /]
[br /]


Impressions of his co-students at Harvard "foul-mouthed", "an inaptitude at dialogue, except when the speakers were raving drunk or profane".[br /]
[br /]


"He was good-looking, very nervous and extremely impatient with Forty-seven----. He was friendly, though rather uneasy and inarticulate at times. You got the impression that he trembled a little and seemed trying to keep from stuttering. But when he delivered himself of a remark, it was impressive."[br /]
[br /]


"A sarcastic bastard"[br /]
[br /]


"Like an oyster in a lunchroom stew."[br /]
[br /]


"(These) theoretical vaporings were to him simply so much asafoetida. While we sat open-mouthed and earnest, he would writhe and squirm in his chair, scowling and muttering in a mezza voice fearful imprecations and protests. Of him, too, we were frightened. He kept so much to himself. He did not invite approach for some weeks, we let him alone."[br /]
[br /]


"There was something apparently irresistible in his strange combination of cruelty around his mouth, intelligence in his eyes, and sympathy in hisvoice and eyes. He was not good-looking. --- He was hard – boiled and whimsical. He was brutal and tender, so I was told. --- About some things Gene was sphinx like."[br /]
[br /]


George Jean Nathan, "I found O’Neill to be an extremely shy fellow, but one who nevertheless appeared to have a vast confidence in himself."[br /]
[br /]


George Jean Nathan, "O’Neill is a deep running personality – the most ambitious mind I have encountered among American dramatists – an uncommon talent."[br /]
[br /]


Olin Downes, "almost feminine sensibilities and has physical tremors and fears" and "this O’Neill is a man’s man, an adventurer born, reasonably close-cropped, spare, fit-looking and very brown, loathing soiled shirts and regretting passage of the Eighteenth Amendment."[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]UNDERSTANDING O’NEILL[/b][br /]
[br /]


Four times winner of the Pulitzer Prize and Nobel Laureate Eugene O’Neill has carved a niche for himself in the world of theatre. His portrayal of life, as he saw it, was very powerful. He took on the larger issues of destiny, religion and psychology out of fine drawing rooms. His characters, who are from the lowest rank of society, come to grips with the problems, for whom destiny triumphs ultimately.[br /]
[br /]


O’Neill was never comfortable with ‘society’ people. He felt he ‘belonged’ to the down-and-outers, the derelicts. Although his plays are peopled with prostitutes, sailors, alcoholics, drug addicts and the like, the underlying themes can be considered Grecian. He used classical techniques of masks, asides and music in a very innovative way and blended them beautifully in his modern plays. O’Neill was also not afraid to grapple with themes like incest, matricide, fratricide, infanticide and suicide, perhaps because these were the experiences of life, as he knew it.[br /]
[br /]


Almost all of O’Neill’s plays are autobiographical. He could write movingly and beautifully about what he had experienced. And except for Long Day’s Journey Into Night, he was not afraid to let them be produced on stage. Perhaps it was his way of making peace with himself and his family, his way of exorcising the ghosts of his past. Whatever the reason, the intensely personal issues of his plays made them very powerful.[br /]
[br /]

[b]BIRTH AND UPBRINGING[/b][br /]
[br /]


On October 16, 1888, Eugene Gladstone O’Neill was born in a hotel room to a successful touring actor, James O’Neill and Ella (Ellan) Quinlan O’Neill. Eugene had to spend his childhood in hotel rooms, trains and on backstage with his mother and elder brother, James Jr He had no permanent ‘home’, except for a small cottage overlooking the Thames River in New London, Connecticut. But there too they were not too welcome as they were "Summer People" and "Theatrical People" and above all, his mother was a known drug addict. Eugene’s childhood memories were not at all pleasant. They brought back dirty dressing rooms, stuffy trains, shoddy hotels; perpetual waiting in the wings and succession of one-night stands.[br /]
[br /]


Eugene’s formal education started as a boarder in Mount St Vincent-on-Hudson at Riverdale, New York. It was a boarding school conducted by the Sisters of Charity. After three years at Mt St Vincent, Eugene was sent to Da La Salle Institute as a day scholar. But in the following year, he became a boarder. He again changed his school and went to Betts Academy in Stamford, Connecticut. It was a typical New England preparatory school, training students to get into Ivy League Colleges. Eugene got into the spirit of things, became quite studious and graduated scoring sufficiently well to be admitted into the Princeton University.[br /]
[br /]

[b]INFLUENCE OF HIS BROTHER[/b][br /]
[br /]


It was around this time that his brother’s influence became evident. He adored his brother, who was an alcoholic and a recognized habitué of all the saloons of Broadway. He introduced Eugene to the seedier side of life, a life of "booze, books and broads." By the end of his freshman’s year, Eugene was suspended from Princeton University. He decided not to return and sought education from ‘Life’. Eugene took up a job at a small mail-order house, The New York – Chicago Supply Company.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MARRIAGE OR MISTAKE ?[/b][br /]
[br /]


Eugene, of 20, met Kathleen Jenkins and soon developed a cordial relationship. He could easily share his rebellious ideas with her, and she always provided a sympathetic audience. They were in love, but marriage and responsibility was just out of question for Eugene, who had yet to prove himself in the eyes of the society. Somehow they reached to the conclusion that marriage was the only way out for them. He requested his father for help, which his father denied outrightly. In 1909 they got married, much against the wishes of the elders on both the sides. He soon left for Honduras. However, the place and people did not appeal him much and he detested the idea of returning to Kathleen. He realized his mistake of marriage. The marriage lasted only a few months, as he soon sailed for Central America, for gold prospecting. He did not see his wife again and divorce was officially granted in 1912. But he had a son by this marriage, born while he was in Honduras. He was named Eugene Gladstone O’Neill, Jr O’Neill returned to New York a few weeks after his son was born, after recovering from a severe bout of Malaria. This period was very depressing. He had failed everywhere – Princeton, job, gold prospecting and marriage. He confessed to it being " the lowest moment of my life". He took an overdose of sleeping pills in his room. When he did not turn up at the bar, his friends decided to investigate. They took him to Bellevue Hospital where he was treated and recovered.[br /]
[br /]

[b]RETURNED TO NEST[/b][br /]
[br /]


After this O'Neill decided to go ‘home’ – as he knew it – somewhere in the theatrical circuit. His father gave him a job with a courtesy title of assistant manager of the theatrical company. He had to sit at the gallery door and see that the ticket collector did not allow any of his friends inside free of cost. He hated the job, and after a violent discussion with his father took off to the sea. He did all kinds of jobs on and off ships. He hung around with all kinds of bums, drifters, alcoholics and derelicts. He could not keep a job for long and kept jumping from one place to another. But through all this he did not stop reading. His favorite authors were Jack London, Joseph Conrad and Rudyard Kipling.[br /]
[br /]


He returned to the United States in 1911, still wild with a liking for drinking in bars and reciting poetry. Within one year, he again sailed out for one last time and was discharged as Able Seaman. He cherished the discharge paper as a very important document.[br /]
[br /]

[b]TRYING HAND ON WRITING[/b][br /]
[br /]


Once again Eugene’s father tried to induct his son into the theatre. He gave Eugene two minor roles to play. But he was a terrible actor and hated acting.[br /]
[br /]


When the family went to their summer home in New London, Eugene went to work for the New London Telegraph, as a reporter. He wrote vividly and dramatically when asked to cover a story, but often forgot to mention the details required – who, how, when, where and why. In August, Judge Frederick P Latimer, the owner of the paper, put his faith in O’Neill and asked him to write verse for the editorial page column Laconics. Apart from reporting, Eugene wrote twice a week for Laconics and signed about 24 pieces, some as E O’Neill, or Eugene O’Neill and some as Tigean Te O’ Neil. He liked it better than anything he had done so far. Laconics gave him confidence and he sent his verses to be published in New York in the Masses, the New York Call and F P A’s Conning Tower as well as to New York Tribune. His first appearance in book form was in the Pleiades Club Year Book published in 1912. He wrote a poem Free that was published in it.[br /]
[br /]


A few days later, Eugene published his last verse in New London’s Telegraph, before he was diagnosed as having tuberculosis and the doctor asked him to go into a sanatorium. The Gaylord Farm Sanatorium at Wallingford, Connecticut was chosen for O'Neill. On Christmas Eve of 1912, he entered Gaylord.[br /]
[br /]

[b]REBIRTH[/b][br /]
[br /]


O'Neill spent his time in Gaylord reading not only the classic dramatists but also the modern ones like Ibsen, Wedekind and Strindberg. It was Strindberg’s works, which inspired him to write for the theatre. For Eugene O'Neill, the stay at Gaylord was practically a ‘rebirth’. He matured intellectually and physiologically. He returned home after about six months, but not before his father had confirmed from the doctor that Eugene was really cured.[br /]
[br /]


Eugene’s homecoming was not free from tensions. Even though he was ill, he was determined not only to work hard and write plays, but also to keep his health. He soon recovered from his ill health.[br /]
[br /]


[b]THE PLAYWRIGHT[/b][br /]
[br /]


When the O’Neills closed down the house, Eugene stayed on in boarding house. He was writing one-act plays at the rate of a play a month. He kept on sending them to Broadway. In a short time, he had written eleven one-act and two full-length plays. In-between he read everything he could lay his hands on – Nietzsche, Wedekind, the Greeks, the Elizabethan and other classics as well as the moderns. During this period, he wrote A Wife For A Life (the first one to be copyrighted), Abortion, Servitude and The Web. The Web is believed to be the first play O’Neill wrote. All the plays are naturally crude and melodramatic with poor dialogues. But they do give a glimpse of O’Neill’s characteristics – cruelty, violent death, tragedy and high drama.[br /]
[br /]

[b]THE INSPIRATION[/b][br /]
[br /]


Eugene had come in contact with the dramatist, Clayton Hamilton during that period. He encouraged O’Neill to write about the life he knew best – about the sea and sailors. Eugene started writing sea-plays. Thirst, Fog and Warnings are quite amateurish, but they do contain the power that marks O’Neill’s plays. There is marked improvement in the quality of work from the time of Bound East for Cardiff. [br /]
[br /]


[b]AT HARVARD AND AFTERWARDS[/b][br /]
[br /]


It was Hamilton who persuaded the elder O’Neill to send his son to Harvard, to study under Professor George Pierce Baker at his 47 Workshop. James O’Neill also put up a thousand dollars for a collection of Eugene’s plays, published under the title Thirst. Besides Thirst, it contained The Web, Recklessness, Fog and Warnings.[br /]
[br /]


Eugene left Harvard the following year and moved to Greenwich Village. He wrote several plays while in Harvard. Among them are The Second Engineer (or The Personal Equation), The Dear Doctor, The Sniper (The best play of this period), A Knock at the Door and Belshazzar. He continued writing for about seven hours daily. He saw his brother quite frequently during this period. James Jr, or Jamie as he was called, was a conformed alcoholic by now. Soon Eugene was to have his last but year-long relapse into the kind of life he had led before he entered the sanatorium. He stopped writing, and for the next 11 or 12 months his sole literary occupation was reciting Francis Thompson’s The Hound of Heaven for the down-and-outers of the saloon he frequented.[br /]
[br /]

[b]BALANCING TWO WORLDS[/b][br /]
[br /]


Although O’Neill drank heavily when on a drinking spree, he always returned to writing whenever he recovered from its after-effects. He felt he ‘belonged’ to the world of saloons full of sea-fearing men and other derelicts. But when the time came for him to do something important and to take care of his health, he had the capacity to give up that world completely.[br /]
[br /]


He soon expressed a desire to get out of the town, preferably live by the ocean and to start writing again. One of his saloon friends owned a shack at Truro, near Provincetown. Provincetown was a small fishing village at the tip of Cape Cod. His friend invited Eugene and soon he began writing. Marriage and its difficulties were still on his mind as reflected in Before Breakfast.[br /]
[br /]

[b]PROVINCETOWN PLAYERS[/b][br /]
[br /]


There was a group of artists and writers in Provincetown who were writing and staging plays, known as the Provincetown Players. His friend chanced to meet a couple of members of the group and they invited O’Neill to read his play. Eugene took Bound East for Cardiff. It was a great success with the group and it was the first Eugene O’Neill play to be produced. It was staged at the Wharf Theatre in Provincetown. The success of Bound East for Cardiff inspired Eugene to write. He wrote four more one-act plays – In the Zone, Ile, The Long Voyage Home and The Moon of the Caribbees. He also completed Before Breakfast, which the group wanted to produce in New York. After the staging of Before Breakfast, Fog and The Sniper were also produced. Eugene O’Neill had arrived on the theatrical scene.[br /]
[br /]


By this time Provincetown was full of rumors of war. Eugene was arrested as a German spy by an over-enthusiastic town constable. Later on he was released. When war was declared against Germany, O’Neill enlisted for the Navy. But he was rejected. His father wanted him to join the Army but he was very much against it. After a very heavy bout of drinking he again returned to Provincetown from New London. As was the pattern, he again stopped drinking and became a workaholic. He was soon to meet a woman who was to become his second wife. Agnes Boulton Burton was a widow with a daughter. Their year of courtship was perhaps the happiest in Eugene’s life. The Cross is Made and The Dreamy Kid were written in this period. Eugene began working on Beyond the Horizon, which later won him his first Pulitzer Prize. Soon Eugene and Agnes went to live in West Point Pleasant near Barneqat Bay in New Jersey. It was the Boulton’s summerhouse. O’Neill spent his time between attending rehearsals of his play in New York and writing The Straw. Most of O’Neill’s plays reflected his state of mind, and so did The Straw. His marital happiness is brought out in this play. It is one of the few plays with a strain of hope. Life was good to O’Neill. Six of his one-act plays were brought out in a book form.[br /]
[br /]

[b]SUCCESS EVERYWHERE[/b][br /]
[br /]


By now, O’Neill’s literary fortunes were on the rise. John D Williams gave a contract for the production of Beyond the Horizon and an option on all his future plays. Meanwhile O’Neill had already begun work on one of his great and enduring successes, Chris Christophersen (later renamed Anna Christie and finally made into a musical comedy New Girl in Town.)[br /]
[br /]


In the winter of 1918, James O’Neill met with an accident. Although he was not hurt badly, the 73 year old ‘Count’ never recovered fully. Jamie and Eugene both rushed to New York and stayed there to be near their father. Soon after Agnes learned that she was pregnant. Knowing Eugene, she did not tell him the news immediately. She wanted him to finish his work. And when she did tell him – his first reaction was that the doctor had made a mistake and his second reaction was silence.[br /]
[br /]

[b]GIFT FROM FATHER[/b][br /]
[br /]


When Eugene and Agnes went to Provincetown for the summer, they got a surprise. The elder O’Neill had purchased Peaked Hill Cottage for his son. Eugene was delighted with his first home. Soon he and Agnes moved into Provincetown proper. This was a trying period as he had three plays under contract and none seemed to be going into production. On October 30, 1919. Agnes gave birth to Shane Rudraighe O’Neill. It is no wonder O’Neill worked on a play Gold during this period.[br /]
[br /]


[b]THE PULITZER PRIZE[/b][br /]
[br /]


When Beyond the Horizon was put into rehearsal, O’Neill went to New York. He saw a good deal of his parents and was beginning to come to terms with his father. The father’s pride for his son knew no bounds when Beyond the Horizon opened for matinee performance. Soon O’Neill received the news that he had won the Pulitzer Prize.[br /]
[br /]

[b]ILL-FATE[/b][br /]
[br /]


Although it was one of the happiest periods of Eugene’s life, he firmly believed that one always has to pay for success. He was not wrong. First his mother fell ill with the flu and Eugene caught it from her. Bed ridden and alone in New York, he worried about his wife and son. Just as mother and son were recovering, James suffered a stroke. Agnes too was finding it difficult to live alone in Provincetown and soon she fell ill and was bedridden. Eugene hurried to her side leaving final rehearsals of Chris. Chris Christopherson was a failure. Eugene’s sense of doom deepened, as Agnes remained bedridden. Meanwhile word came from New York that the doctors were considering surgery for his father, but later on it was ruled out as nothing good would come out of it. The Straw was to be staged, but it was to be tried out with a few matinees at Boston. There was a lot of unpleasantness between O’Neill and the producer for the production of the play and finally it was dropped.[br /]
[br /]


Around this time James O’Neill took a turn for the worse. He recovered in a hospital and went to New London. He had hardly settled in New London when he had to be hospitalized again. Jamie and Eugene rushed to New London. Agnes also joined them. Soon James slipped into unconsciousness. It was a harrowing summer for the whole family, with both the brothers, Jamie and Eugene doing a great deal of drinking. James O’Neill died on August 10, 1920.[br /]
[br /]

[b]SECOND PULITZER[/b][br /]
[br /]


He wrote two plays, Different and the Emperor Jones during this period. Produced by the Provincetown Players, Emperor Jones was a great success. It brought worldwide fame for O’Neill as well as the Provincetown Players. But fame did not bring money. The responsibilities as a family man weighed heavily on him. Despite his despondency, O’Neill kept on writing. The First Man and The Fountain are plays written during this period. Gold was produced but it was not a success and so The Straw, which was produced sometime later. Anna Christie opened in November 1921, well received by both reviewers and audiences. He was awarded his second Pulitzer Prize for Anna Christie.[br /]
[br /]


[b]EUGENE MEETING EUGENE[/b][br /]
[br /]


O’Neill went back of Provincetown and set to work on The Hairy Ape. That winter he also met his first born for the first time in eleven years. Father and son ‘hit off’ very well and O’Neill sponsored his son’s education to help him enter a first rate college.[br /]
[br /]

[b]DEATH OF MOTHER[/b][br /]
[br /]


A few days before The Hairy Ape was to open at the Playwrights’ Theatre (the Provincetown Players’ name for New York) Eugene learned that his mother had died in Los Angeles. She and Jamie had gone there to sell an orange grove. Her body was brought back to New York and from there it was taken to New London where she was laid to rest. Eugene received about $ 56,000 as his share from his mother’s estate.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MEETING CARLOTTA MONTEREY[/b][br /]
[br /]


The Hairy Ape was being staged and O'Neill went only once to visit the crew after attending his mother's funeral. Carlotta Monterey was the replacement for the role of Mildred. She was a famous actress, more famous for her spectacular beauty rather than her acting. O'Neill met Carlotta and tried to be friendly with her. But she disliked him in the beginning. However, time bridged the gulf and they started to sought eachother's company often. [br /]
[br /]


[b]GREENWICH VILLAGE THEATRE[/b][br /]
[br /]


For the first time O’Neill found himself financially well off. He and Agnes thought of buying a house and decided on Brook Farm at Ridgefield, Connecticut. In their first year at Brook Farm, Eugene and Agnes encountered some difficulties in their marriage. The old Provincetown group was also breaking up. O’Neill had formed his own Greenwich Village Theatre which staged his play Welded. But apart from that he did not do any writing till he returned to Peaked Hill for the summer. He fixed the outline for Marco Millions, but did not work on it. But with All God’s Chillun Got Wings he again started working eight to ten hours a day.[br /]
[br /]

[b]DEATH OF BROTHER[/b][br /]
[br /]


Meanwhile Jamie was confined to a sanatorium, a confirmed alcoholic. He died there in early November 1923. Eugene was unable to cope with Jamie’s death, got very drunk and stayed that way. Agnes took charge and Jamie was buried in New London. Eugene inherited Jamie’s estate and was now a man of comfortable means. But he was more than convinced that some terrible force was at work and he would pay for his success. More than ever he felt that he was alone.[br /]
[br /]


When they returned to Ridgefield, Agnes was pregnant again. O’Neill soon became engrossed in writing Desire Under the Elms.[br /]
[br /]


[b]THE FAMILY GREW LARGER[/b][br /]
[br /]


Soon after O’Neill went to Bermuda on the recommendation of an old Greenwich Village companion. He settled there and started working on The Great God Brown. It was here that Agnes gave birth to their daughter, Oona in 1925. Family life made Eugene nervous. When they returned to the US a month after Oona was born, he spent most of his time in New York while Agnes and the children stayed in a rented house in Nantucket. Lazarus Laughed was written in this period. He also produced The Great God Brown, which makes innovative use of masks. It ran for about a year.[br /]
[br /]


The O’Neills returned to Bermuda. Eugene O'Neill bought ‘Spithead’, which he planned to make his permanent home. He had also begun work on Strange Interlude, which along with Mourning Becomes Electra and Long Day’s Journey into Night is one of Eugene’s best plays.[br /]
[br /]

[b]CARLOTTA AGAIN[/b][br /]
[br /]


After receiving an honorary degree of Doctor of Literature from Yale University, Eugene and his family went to Belgrade Lakes in Maine. It was here that O’Neill met Carlotta Monterey. It was their second meeting.[br /]
[br /]


The O’Neills settled down in Spithead. Tension was slowly building up between husband and wife. O’Neill was not a great father, but he was most comfortable with his first-born Eugene, Jr. After a long wait O’Neill’s play Strange Interlude was to be put on Broadway. Soon O'Neill left for New York leaving Agnes, Oona and Shane at Spithead.[br /]
[br /]


Around this time O’Neill had stopped drinking although it is not very clear as to why. May be his mother’s failure to overcome her addiction to drugs was a factor or O'Neill’s psychoanalytic sessions with Dr Hamilton contributed to it. He was also corresponding with his son Shane and letting him know how much he was missing them all and Spithead. But soon the letters stopped. Before long all his friends knew about his seeing Carlotta. He was in a desperate situation. He was torn between his love for his family and Carlotta. He immersed himself in work and kept busy by attending rehearsals of both Marco Millions and Strange Interludes. When both the plays were finally launched, O’Neill spent some time with Eugene Jr. and also wrote to Shane. He soon left for California for the rehearsals of Lazarus Laughed and from there for London. By this time he had decided to leave Agnes. From there he fled to France and spread a false report about his whereabouts, to keep it a secret.[br /]
[br /]

[b]TURMOIL IN MIND[/b][br /]
[br /]


For about a year O’Neill roamed all over the world. He tried to find peace of mind, but the furies were within him. He wrote Dynamo while in London. O’Neill and Carlotta soon set out for a world trip. His mind was still in turmoil. Perhaps he could not come to terms with his decision to leave his wife and children. Although Eugene and Carlotta behaved like tourists, O’Neill’s mind was more occupied by his own guilt and self-loathing. He turned to his notebook, and the seeds of Mourning Becomes Electra were sown. But it was to be six months more before he did any work on this American version of the Greek tragedy. His unmanageable universe burst in Shanghai when O’Neill went missing for two weeks. When he was finally found, he was ill from alcohol and bronchitis. Mentally too he was in the process of a nervous breakdown. The news flashed all around the world. His hopes of "seeking peace and quiet" in the east were crushed. He returned to France secretly and under an assumed name. But the China experience had matured him as an artist. It had "done a lot for my soul", he confessed. He wrote to Shane, "…….all the bitterness got burned out of me and the future years will prove this."[br /]
[br /]

[b]AGNES QUITTED[/b][br /]
[br /]


Agnes finally decided to seek a divorce. She returned to the US and then began the bitter task of finalizing the terms. It took more than a year to finalize everything. Agnes opted for a divorce in Reno and was granted one on July 2, 1929. Just three weeks later Eugene and Carlotta were married.[br /]
[br /]


They had rented a chateau near Tours and moved into it. Around this time a woman writer sued Eugene for plagiarizing Strange Interlude from her novel. O’Neill also started working on his Electra trilogy. It would be almost two years and several rewrites before O’Neill would be satisfied with his work. He worked at a killing pace and except for vacations, he was writing and rewriting his most ambitious piece of work. Even when he was unwell, he continued with his work. Carlotta also helped him fair-copy the write-ups. O'Neill was very fastidious with his writing equipment, his 12 well-sharpened pencils arranged properly alongwith papers before he sat to write. Carlotta had a hard time taking care of O'Neill and his work pattern in the absence of servants who had gone to serve the country in the war.[br /]
[br /]

[b]THE HOMECOMING[/b][br /]
[br /]


The plagiarism suit was dismissed and the Theatre Guild produced Mourning Becomes Electra. A joyful and serene O’Neill looked forward to going back home.[br /]
[br /]


This homecoming was marred by the suicide of Carlotta’s former husband Ralph Barton. He had mentioned Carlotta in his suicide note and the O’Neill’s had to face some dreaded publicity.[br /]
[br /]


Eugene O’Neill had kept in touch with all his three children, but had seen little of them. Eugene Jr was doing well in Yale and soon got married. O’Neill did not attend the wedding.[br /]
[br /]


During this time he also had a brief and uncomfortable reunion with Shane and Oona.[br /]
[br /]

[b]SPIRITUAL STRUGGLE[/b][br /]
[br /]


Mourning Becomes Electra was very well received. It was a five hours play with an hour’s intermission for dinner. Eugene had already started thinking of a cycle of three plays, one at the time of the Revolution, another in 1840 and the third "at the present." This trilogy of plays would one day grow to 11 and dominate his life. Much to Carlotta’s disapproval he enjoyed meeting his old friends – the rough and tough guys of "old days". Meanwhile, he was ill and bedridden at frequent intervals. As usual, O’Neill soon got tired of New York and bought a piece of land at Sea Island, and built a 22-room house on it. They moved into it as soon as it was ready. He soon got busy writing Days Without End, which mirrors O’Neill’s struggle to find a solution to his own spiritual doubts. He labored over the play, but got frustrated and decided to take a week off. He woke up the next morning with the complete details of Ah, Wilderness ! in his mind. He could complete the play in a very short time. O’Neill wrote some of his most cheerful and optimistic lines in the play.[br /]
[br /]


Apart the spiritual struggle, Eugene also had financial worries. Electra was closed and he had no other play ready for production. His capital assets were either mortgaged or would fetch very little if sold. But he was not the only one with financial problems. The depression was taking its toll.[br /]
[br /]

[b]THE MASTERPIECES[/b][br /]
[br /]


At last Days Without End was finished. Ah wilderness ! opened first, to good reviews, but Days Without End stirred up a controversy. Some Catholics thought that O’Neill had returned to the fold, but the Church did not give its approval. This left O’Neill very bitter. Ironically, the play received Vatican approval a few years after his death.[br /]
[br /]


O’Neill was, by now, planning a cycle of 11 plays spanning over one hundred and fifty years. He wanted to show in family after family, the same psychological fate dogging parents, children, grandchildren and great-grand children, down through the time. Henceforth this recurrent theme would appear in all his plays. He started working so hard on his plays, that he had a close shave from a complete breakdown.[br /]
[br /]

[b]THE NOBEL[/b][br /]
[br /]


The restlessness, which dogged O’Neill all his life asserted itself and the O’Neill’s decided to go west. He soon resumed his work. In November 1936, rumors spread that O’Neill was to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, which proved to be true. He was willing to go to Stockholm to receive the prize, but it was not to be. Illness struck O’Neill and he was unable to leave his bed. He wrote a gracious letter to the committee to be read at the presentation ceremony.[br /]
[br /]


O’Neill suffered severe abdominal pains, which were diagnosed as appendicitis. But before it could be removed, it burst. This ushered in a continuous chain of ailments. His hands trembled more noticeably and he had lost considerable weight. He was given the award by the representatives of King Gustav in the hospital without any speeches and fanfare.[br /]
[br /]


Carlotta and O’Neill once more decided to build a house. Tao House was the ultimate abode. It was one home that they enjoyed and lived there longer than anywhere else.[br /]
[br /]


O’Neill was feeling better, but he still could not work. Neuritis, a new illness, had affected his right arm. When he did resume work, his grueling routine did not change. Although he could write perfectly formed letters, his writing became progressively smaller. Carlotta, who served as his secretary and typed his script, often used a magnifying glass to read his writing. Carlotta was a very good housekeeper and went to great lengths to see that O’Neill had total peace and quiet so that his creative process was not interrupted. Work was going on well on the plays of the cycle. It was called A Tale of the Possessors, Self-Dispossessed. One of the plays of the cycle A Touch of the Poet was later produced. Suddenly O’Neill began to feel that he had gone stale on his cycle. The news of the war in Europe was not very optimistic. In despair about the world situation and convinced that the future is bound to be more dismal, O’Neill once again turned to the wretched lives of his old friends, in search for some meaning in life. The Iceman Cometh is the dramatic expression of his search. O’Neill was happy working again and started on another play.[br /]
[br /]

[b]THE BEST GIFT[/b][br /]
[br /]


O’Neill’s health was deteriorating slowly. The trembling of his hands was violent at times, seemingly growing worse. He was also finishing Long Day’s Journey Into Night. It was the most difficult play to write. It was his way of making peace with his family. Perhaps O’Neill’s inscription to a copy of the manuscript tells it the best –[br /]
[br /]


"For Carlotta on our 12th Wedding Anniversary.[br /]
[br /]


Dearest, I give you the original script of the play of old sorrow, written in tears and blood. A sadly inappropriate gift, it would seem, for a day celebrating happiness. But you will understand. I mean it as a tribute to your love and tenderness which gave me the faith in love that enabled me to face my dead at last and write this play – write it with deep pity and understanding for all the four haunted Tyrones…………."[br /]
[br /]

[b]PLAYS THAT EARNED HIM HIGHEST FAME[/b][br /]
[br /]


O’Neill left strict instructions that this play was neither to be published nor produced till after 25 years of his death. But contrary to his whishes the play was produced in 1956.[br /]
[br /]


As soon as he finished Long Day’s Journey Into Night, O’Neill began his work on the cycle. There was a sense of urgency in him. He did not want to work on anything that might take four or five years to complete. He prepared to write plays he wanted to write for a long time and he knew he had time to finish. The world-shattering events of the day prompted him to write The Last Conquest.[br /]
[br /]


[b]PHYSICALLY UNWELL[/b][br /]
[br /]


One of the worst periods of his life soon began. The rigidity and trembling increased. Moreover, all their servants either enlisted or they went to work in defense plants. Neighbors came and helped the stranded couple. O’Neill got busy writing A Moon For The Misbegotten, his last work.[br /]
[br /]

[b]RELATIONS WITH HIS CHILDREN[/b][br /]
[br /]


Perhaps it was his childhood memories, and upbringing, but O’Neill was never very comfortable with his children, especially Shane and Oona. He kept up his correspondence with them and invited them over for vacations. He financed their education and did not want to be cut off completely from them. In fact, it was one of his major fears that his children might forget him. But in spite of that he was never at ease with them. Neither were they comfortable with him. He was quite satisfied with Eugene Jr but he was quite stiff with Shane. Perhaps he felt uncomfortable with Shane because he was too much like O’Neill himself. Like O’Neill’s, Shane’s childhood had been full of instability and loneliness. He also shunned publicity and society. Later on he also started drinking, went to sea and lived amongst the down-and-outers. Oona and O’Neill never really got on well. The reason of their rift is not very clear, but it culminated when Oona married Charlie Chaplin, thrice her age, in June 1943. O’Neill wrote a very harsh and his last letter to Oona for her marriage. After that he did not get in touch with his daughter. His relationship with his children was almost as if he could not forgive them because he himself had abandoned them. One can’t help wondering that things might have been different if one or two gestures had been made.[br /]
[br /]

[b]LATER YEARS[/b][br /]
[br /]


Both O’Neill and Carlotta were failing in their health. It became impossible to look after Tao House without servants. Reluctantly they moved to an apartment in San Francisco and put up Tao House for sale. O’Neill suffered a paralytic stroke. Even before the stroke, O’Neill had not been able to write anything. During this period O’Neill suffered doubly – he lost his ability to write and he lost his daughter, even when he never really had one.[br /]
[br /]


It was not until 1945 that the O’Neills returned to New York. By this time Eugene Jr had established his reputation as a scholar and had been married thrice – all marriages ending in divorce. Shane was living in Greenwich Village, spending his time drinking, smoking marijuana and listening to Jazz. He married Cathy Givens on July 31, 1944. He did not inform his father about his marriage, nor did he look him up when he went to California soon after his marriage.[br /]
[br /]


[b]REUNION WITH SHANE[/b][br /]
[br /]


Whoever saw O’Neill in this period was shocked at his appearance. He looked gaunt and shrunken. The trembling of his hands had also increased. Physicians examining him differed in their opinion about his illness. After five years O’Neill had a reunion with Shane. Since Cathy was almost due for the first time, she did not accompany her husband. Their meeting went off well. When Eugene III was born, Carlotta went to the hospital to see Cathy. Afterwards father and son saw a lot of each other. On February 11, 1946, Eugene III died an accidental death and later on Shane and Cathy went to Bermuda to get away from it all. O’Neill financed them but the whole amount was deducted from Agnes’ alimony. On their return, they never met O’Neill again. Not even when Shane was arrested for possession of heroin.[br /]
[br /]

[b]THE FALTERING LINES[/b][br /]
[br /]


After settling down in New York, O’Neill busied himself with rehearsals of The Iceman Cometh, till he came down with flu. By the time The Iceman Cometh opened, Shane had started loosing his health. His depressions continued and intensified by the prospect of having another child. Eugene Jr was also facing a sense of doom. He lost the two persons to whom he was very close in quick succession. His stepfather and his grandmother died within a span of a year. O’Neill was also frustrated as he could not write and set to paper the plays he wrote in his mind and heart.[br /]
[br /]




A Moon for the Misbegotten was the last play that O’Neill wrote and also the last to be produced before his death but frequent illness prevented O’Neill from attending rehearsals regularly.[br /]
[br /]


Carlotta stood by O’Neill through thick and thin, except for one episode when she left him. But she soon returned to look after him till his death.[br /]
[br /]


Once again O’Neill’s dream of finding a permanent home surfaced, and once again it was to be a cottage by the sea – "with my feet in the Atlantic." O’Neill seemed to be getting better. In fact, he started working on a new play. But the optimism was short lived. Soon there were rumors that both O’Neill and Carlotta were very ill.[br /]
[br /]

[b]LOSS OF FIRSTBORN[/b][br /]
[br /]


In September 1947, Eugene Jr committed suicide. His life had gone out of control for quite sometime now, and he had been drinking heavily. His father got the news over the telephone, and remained silent, except to say that with Eugene’s death, Long Day’s Journey Into Night could be published.[br /]
[br /]

[b]THE TRYING TIMES[/b][br /]
[br /]


The next three years of Eugene O’Neill’s life were perhaps the most wretched ones. By now both Eugene and Carlotta were unwell and dissension had split their household. Once when the attending doctor came on a routine visit to the O’Neill house he found Eugene lying on the rocks outside in the front yard. His knee was fractured. He was taken to the hospital, where Carlotta created a scene. She was admitted to the State Institution for the Mentally Ill. After getting released from the institution Carlotta took up a separate residence and filed for separate support. O’Neill went to New York and was admitted to Doctors Hospital.[br /]
[br /]


Carlotta called O’Neill towards the end of April, and agreed to look after him. O’Neill was "all smiles". In May, he said goodbye to his old friends knowing that he was not to meet them again. He accepted it as his destiny. Much against his wishes O’Neill allowed A Moon for the Misbegotten to be published, as they needed the money.[br /]
[br /]


By this time Oona was settled abroad and Shane spent his time wandering back and forth between Point Pleasant and New York. He had become an alcoholic and a drug addict, often picked up by the police. O’Neill never expressed criticism or complained about his children, but he became more and more unhappy and ill. In the last year of his life, he with Carlotta’s help destroyed at least six of his cycle-plays, as he didn’t want anybody else to finish his plays.[br /]
[br /]

[b]EXITED FOREVER[/b][br /]
[br /]


He began to sink on November 26, 1953 and he breathed his last a little after three in the morning of November 27, 1953. Carlotta took charge of the funeral, and he was buried in the Forest Hills Cemetery without anyone being informed. Carlotta was made the sole beneficiary of his estate – his son and daughter were completely cut off by the new Will.[br /]
[br /]


Eugene O’Neill had at last found peace.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]EUGENE O’NEILL [ 1888 – 1953 ][/b][br /]
[br /]


When Eugene O’Neill entered the theatre as a playwright, Broadway consisted mainly of musicals, melodramas and farces, with an occasional ‘quality’ fair from Europe. For O’Neill, the theatre was a very appropriate platform for serious ideas. He began by exploring not only difficult subjects, but also different dramatic styles. He became a major influence on the American Theatre. He used characters, which were thought to be fit only for novels – the derelicts and downtrodden. But in his hands they became powerful. He took the ancient Greek tragedy techniques and blended them beautifully in his plays, providing a much-wanted depth in the American Theatre. As it is aptly said, "Before O’Neill the United States had theatre: after O’Neill, it had drama."[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]OCTOBER 16, 1888[/b] Born in New York.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1906 [/b]Graduated from Betts academy.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1907 [/b]Suspended from Princeton University.[br /]
[br /]

[b]SUMMER 1909[/b] Married Kathleen Jenkins.[br /]
[br /]

[b]OCTOBER 1909[/b] Sailed to Honduras, Central America, for gold prospecting.[br /]
[br /]

[b]May 5, 1910[/b] Eugene Gladstone O’Neill, Junior was born.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1911[/b] Returned to America.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1912[/b] First appearance in book form – his poem Free published in Pleiades Club Year Book.[br /]
[br /]

[b]MAY 1912[/b] Returned and went to work for the New London Telegraph.[br /]
[br /]

[b]AUGUST 1912[/b] Wrote his first verse published in Laconics in New London Telegraph.[br /]
[br /]

[b]OCTOBER 11, 1912[/b] Official divorce effected from Kathleen.[br /]
[br /]

[b]CHRISTMAS EVE, 1912[/b] Entered the Gaylord Farm Sanatorium at Wallingford, Connecticut for tubercular treatment.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JUNE 3, 1913[/b] Returned home to New London.[br /]
[br /]

[b]FALL, 1914[/b] Entered Baker’s 47 Workshop at Harvard.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1915[/b] Left Harvard.[br /]
[br /]

[b]APRIL 12, 1918[/b] Married Agnes Boulton Burton.[br /]
[br /]

[b]OCTOBER 30, 1919[/b] Shane Rudraighe O’Neill was born.[br /]
[br /]

[b]AUGUST 10, 1920[/b] James O’Neill died.[br /]
[br /]

[b]WINTER, 1921[/b] Met Eugene O’Neill, Jr after a gap of 11 years.[br /]
[br /]

[b]FEBRUARY 1922[/b] Ella died.[br /]
[br /]

[b]NOVEMBER 8, 1924[/b] James (Jamie) O’Neill, Jr died.[br /]
[br /]

[b]MAY 13, 1925[/b] Oona was born.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JUNE 23, 1926[/b] Received honorary degree of Doctor of Literature from Yale.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JULY 2, 1929[/b] Divorced Agnes.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JULY 22, 1929[/b] Married Carlotta Monterey.[br /]
[br /]

[b]MARCH 1932[/b] Lionized.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JUNE 16, 1943[/b] Oona married Charlie Chaplin.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JULY 31, 1944[/b] Shane married Cathy Givens.[br /]
[br /]

[b]NOVEMBER 31, 1945[/b] Eugene III was born to Shane and Cathy.[br /]
[br /]

[b]FEBRUARY 11, 1946[/b] Eugene Jr committed suicide.[br /]
[br /]

[b]NOVEMBER 27, 1953[/b] Eugene O’Neill died at Boston.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]Bound East for Cardiff[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

Warf Theatre, Provincetown, Massachusetts[br /]

Summer 1916.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Thirst[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

Warf Theatre, Provincetown, Massachusetts[br /]

Summer 1916.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Before Breakfast[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

December 1, 1916.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Fog [/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

January 1917.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Sniper[/b] [br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

February 16, 1917.[br /]
[br /]

[b]In the Zone[/b][br /]
Produced by Washington Square Players.[br /]

Comedy Theatre, New York[br /]

October 31, 1917.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Long Voyage Home[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

November 2, 1917.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Ile[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

April 26, 1918.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Rope[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

April 26, 1918.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Where the Cross is Made[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

November 22, 1918.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Moon of the Caribbees[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

December 20, 1918.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Dreamy Kid[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

October 31, 1919.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Beyond the Horizon[/b][br /]
Produced by John D Williams.[br /]

Morosco Theatre, New York[br /]

February 2, 1920, with Richard Bennett and Elsie Rizer.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Chris Christopherson[/b][br /]
Produced by George C Tyler,[br /]

Atlantic City.[br /]

March 8, 1920.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Exorcism[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

March 26, 1920.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Emperor Jones[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

November 3, 1920, with Charles Gilpin and Jasper Decter.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Different [/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York[br /]

December 27, 1920 with James Light.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Gold [/b][br /]
Produced by John D Williams.[br /]

Frazee Theatre, New York[br /]

June 1, 1921 with Willard Mack.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Anna Christie[/b][br /]
Produced by Arthur Hopkins.[br /]

Vanderbilt Theatre, New York [br /]

November 10, 1921, with Pauline Lord, Frank Shannon and George Marion.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Straw[/b][br /]
Produced by George C Tyler.[br /]

Greenwich Village Theatre, New York[br /]

November 10, 1921, with Margalo Gilmore and Otto Kruger.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The First Man[/b][br /]
Produced by Neighborhood Playhouse.[br /]

Neighborhood Playhouse, New York[br /]

March 4, 1922, with Augustine Duncan and Margaret Mower.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Hairy Ape[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Players.[br /]

The Playwrights’ Theatre, New York [br /]

March 9, 1922, with Louis Wolheim.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Welded[/b][br /]
Produced by Mac Gowan, Jones and O’Neill with the Selwyns[br /]

39th Street Theatre, New York[br /]

March 17, 1924, with Doris Keane and Jacob Ben-Ami.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Ancient Mariner[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Playhouse.[br /]

Provincetown Playhouse, New York[br /]

April 6, 1924, with E J Ballantine.[br /]
[br /]

[b]All God’s Chillun Got Wings[/b][br /]
Produced by Provincetown Playhouse.[br /]

Provincetown Playhouse, New York [br /]

May 15, 1924, with Paul Robeson and Mary Blair[br /]
[br /]

[b]S. S. Glencairn[/b][br /]
Produced by Barnstormers.[br /]

Barnstormers Barn, Provincetown, Massachusetts[br /]

August 14, 1924, with Sidney Machet.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Desire Under the Elms[/b] [br /]
Produced by Provincetown Playhouse.[br /]

Greenwich Village Theatre, New York[br /]

November 11, 1924, with Walter Huston and Mary Morris.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Fountain[/b][br /]
Produced by Mac Gowan, Jones and O’Neill with A L Jones and Morris Green[br /]

Greenwich Village Theatre, New York[br /]

December 10, 1925, with Walter Huston.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Great God Brown[/b][br /]
Produced by Mac Gowan, Jones and O’Neill,[br /]

Greenwich Village Theatre, New York[br /]

January 23, 1926, with William Harrigan, Robert Keith and Leona Hogarth.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Marco Millions[/b][br /]
Produced by Theatre Guild.[br /]

Guild theatre, New York[br /]

January 9 1928, with Alfred Lunt and Marqalo Gilmore[br /]
[br /]

[b]Strange Interlude[/b][br /]
Produced by Theatre Guild.[br /]

John Golden Theatre, New York[br /]

January 30, 1928, with Lynn Fontanne, Earle Larimore and Glenn Anders.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Lazarus Laughed[/b][br /]
Produced by Pasadena Community[br /]

Playhouse, Pasadena, California[br /]

April 9, 1928.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Dynamo[/b][br /]
Produced by Theatre Guild.[br /]

Martin Beck Theatre, New York[br /]

February 11, 1929, With Glenn Anders,Dudley Digges and Claudette Colbert[br /]
[br /]

[b]Mourning Becomes Electra[/b][br /]
(A trilogy – Home coming, The Hunted and The Haunted)[br /]

Produced by Theatre Guild[br /]

Guild Theatre, New York[br /]

October 26, 1931, with All Nazimova, Alice Brady and Earle Larimore.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Ah, Wilderness ![/b][br /]
Produced by Theatre Guild.[br /]

Guild Theatre, New York[br /]

October 2, 1933, with George M Cohan and Gene Lockhart.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Days without End[/b][br /]
Produced by Theatre Guild.[br /]

Guild Theatre, New York[br /]

January 8, 1934, with Earle Larimore and Stanley Ridges.[br /]
[br /]

[b]The Iceman Cometh[/b][br /]
Produced by Theatre Guild.[br /]

Martin Beek Theatre, New York[br /]

September 2, 1946, with James Barton and Dudley Digges.[br /]
[br /]

[b]Long Day’s Journey into Night[/b][br /]
Produced by Leigh Connel, Theodore Mann and Jose Quintero.[br /]

Helen Hayes Theatre, New York[br /]

November 7, 1956, with Frederick March and Florence Eldridge.[br /]
[br /]

[b]A Moon for The Misbegotten[/b][br /]
Produced by Carmen Capalbo and Stanley Chase.[br /]

Bijou Theatre, New York[br /]

May 2, 1957, with Wendy Hiller, Franchot Tone and Cyril Cusaek.[br /]
[br /]

[b]A Touch of The Poet[/b][br /]
Produced by The Producer’s Theatre.[br /]

Helen Hayes Theatre, New York[br /]

October 2, 1958, with Helen Hayes, Eric Portman,[br /]

Kim Stanley and Betty Field.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] Censorship of anything, at any time, in any place, on whatever pretense, has always been and always be the last resort of the boob and the bigot.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] If a person is to get the meaning of life he must learn to like the facts about himself – ugly as they may seem to his sentimental vanity – before he can learn the truth behind the facts. And the truth is never ugly.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] Obsessed by a fairy tale, we spend our lives searching for a magic door and a last kingdom of peace.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] Happiness hates the timid ! So does science ![br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] This is Daddy’s bedtime secret for today: Man is born broken. He lives by mending. The grace of God is glue.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] Critics ? I love every bone in their heads.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] The old – like children – talk to themselves, for they have reached that hopeless wisdom of experience which knows that though one were to cry it in the streets to multitudes, or whisper it in the kiss to one’s beloved, the only ears that can ever hear one’s secrets are one’s own.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] Man’s loneliness is but his fear of life.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] Raw emotion produces the worst in people.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] Revenge is the subconscious motive for the individual’s behavior with the rest of the society. Revulsion drives a man to tell others of his sin. --- It is the furies within us that seek to destroy us. --- Vice and virtue cannot live side by side. It’s the humiliation of a loving kiss that destroys evil.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] I do not think you can write anything of value or understanding about the present. You can only write about life if it is far enough in the past. The present is too much mixed up with the superficial values, you can’t know which thing is important and which is not.[br /]
[br /]

[b]•[/b] It will take man a million years to grow up and obtain a soul.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]Pulitzer Prize[/b][br /]
[br /]


[b]Beyond the Horizon[/b] 1920[br /]
[br /]


[b]Anna Christie[/b] 1922[br /]
[br /]


[b]Strange Interlude[/b] 1928[br /]
[br /]


[b]Long Day’s Journey into Night[/b] 1957[br /]
[br /]


1936 [b]Nobel Prize of Literature,[/b] the first American playwright to be honored. [br /]
[br /]
[br /]

Comments - Eugene Gladstone O’Neill