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Detail of Biography - Jackie Chan
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Jackie Chan
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Biography - Jackie Chan
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The little dragon Jackie Chan was born on April 7, 1954. His real name was Chan Kwong Sang. At the time of his birth, his family was so impoverished that they were ready to sell their child for 25 dollars to the British doctor whose delivery bill was beyond their budget.[br /]
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[b]Jackie’s[/b] earliest years were spent in the servant’s quarters of the Australian Embassy in Hong Kong where his father Charles was the cook and his mother Lee-lee was a domestic.[br /]
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[b]Jackie’s[/b] father Charles Chan, a very good martial artist, was a specialist in the Siu-Hung-Kun technique. In the 1940s, he had left his hometown Shantung and settled in Hong Kong. A good natured and principled man, he avoided violence and took up the job of cook in the Australian Embassy. The commissioner whom the elder Chan had served was transferred to Australia. Chan was invited to join the US embassy in Australia for his superlative culinary skills. In 1960, Jackie’s father decided to accept the invitation, and along with wife and six-year-old son, left for Australia.[br /]
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[b]Metamorphosis Of Little Dragon[/b][br /]
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The following year Charles Chan decided that the Australian setting was inappropriate for his son’s education, and brought him back to Hong Kong to be enrolled at the Peking Opera School.The school, also known as the Chinese Opera Research Institute, was a performing arts school based on the rigorous and stylized Peking Opera tradition. Initially, the acrobatic Peking Opera training seemed to be everything a rambunctious boy could ask for. Jackie was fascinated by the acrobatic maneuvers the young bald students were performing. After a total period of the acrobatics, fighting techniques, dancing and acting taught at the school, his parents asked his opinion. Jackie gave a very enthusiastic ‘yes’. His father, satisfied with his son’s attitude, consented to let him be enrolled, for the master (or Sifu) was a good friend of his.[br /]
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The school gave him the option of 3, 5, 7 or 10 year contracts. Chan discussed this with his eager-to-join son who agreed to take the 10-year option.[br /]
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At the school, Jackie was given the name Yuen Lo by the master, and a hard life began for the young boy. Jackie was for a rude shock when he saw the goings on in the school. The masters would force the students to do things that their young bodies could not. If someone could not do the slips, the master would push them down until they did it. If someone could not do a flip, they were forced to do it again and again regardless of the bruises. Any small mistake would result in a punishment, which ranged from standing head over heals for eight hours to deprivation of food, which already consisted of a meager diet. Yet, these were considered but the milder ones of the many punishments at the school.[br /]
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When Jackie’s mother left Hong Kong for Australia, he cried for hours. When mild punishments failed to quieten him, the master gave him a brutal beating. He was kicked and punched by the master so severely, that he was unable to get up and move for days.[br /]
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Jackie was just six and a half years old when he joined the school. His early training was both rigorous and varied. Lessons in acrobatics, the study of different martial arts styles, acting, singing, and pantomime were taught during backbreaking days that started at five in the morning and ran until midnight. During a decade of virtual indentured servitude, Chan and his ‘brothers’ (fellow students) were routinely beaten for infractions both imagined and real. Jackie Chan’s greatest regret is the lack of formal education at the school, fundamentals like reading and mathematics less than 10 hours per week. Here he met two companions, Fuen Biao and Fuen Lung (also known as Samo Hung). The trio later came to be known as ‘The Three Brothers’).[br /]
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[b]Jackie,[/b] Samo Hung, Yuen Biao and other four students were members of a small group that the master formed. They performed traditional Chinese opera with lots of acrobatics. The group was named "The Group of Seven Little Fortunes". During this time, Jackie got a chance to work in a Cantonese film Big and Little Wong Tin Bar, at the age of 8. Later he worked in about 20 films as a child artist.[br /]
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[b]Landing On The Movie Screen[/b][br /]
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In 1971, Jackie finally graduated from the school and immediately left for Australia to join his parents. There, the 17-year-old tried his hand at various odd jobs from dishwasher to bricklayer. Australia did not seem to offer the young Chan a chance to grow, so Jackie took-off from the southerh hemisphee and landed in Hong Kong film industry, where he started working as an extra-cum-stuntman at the Shaw Brothers Studios.[br /]
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Moviegoers first noticed him when he worked in Fist of Fury, starring Hong Kong’s superstar Bruce Lee. For that film he reportedly completed the highest fall in the history of Chinese film industry, earning the respectful notice of the formidable Lee.[br /]
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In a scene, Bruce Lee was required to kick Jackie through a wall. Jackie threw himself backward with such intensity and vigor that Lee was worried and quickly inquired after the young stuntman.[br /]
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By this time Jackie, along with his stunt work, also doubled as chef for the stuntmen section having inherited his father’s culinary skills. His martial arts skills and his stunt prowess impressed moviemakers enough to approach him with a major role. Audience loved the cute, skilled, and energetic Chan in his first major role in The Little Tiger of Guandong. But the features that followed were relative disappointments for Jackie. In 1976, after making Hand of Death, an early effort by the now well-known John Woo, Jackie was quite unhappy with the progress of his career. Meanwhile, he returned to Australia to visit his parents and learnt English. Eventually, boredom, frustration, and restlessness got the better of him and he soon returned to Hong Kong and the Lo Wei Film Company picked him up for a lead.[br /]
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[b]Jackie In Bruce's Shadow[/b][br /]
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After the tragic death of Bruce Lee, it was evident that Asian moviegoers needed another kung-fu star. Lo Wei, the owner of the Lo Wei Film Company and Jackie’s new employer, was a Triad (Chinese Mafia). Lo Wei had been on a hunt for someone to carry on the mantle of the late Bruce Lee when he noticed the work of the Peking Opera School graduate. In an obvious attempt to emulate Bruce Lee, who had been known as ‘Siu Lung’ or ‘Little Dragon’, Jackie was renamed as ‘Sing Lung’ or ‘Becomes the Dragon’.[br /]
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In 1976, Jackie acted in his first film directed by Lo Wei, New Fist of Fury. This film evidently had Jackie Chan in a Bruce Lee type role. Jackie was uncomfortable acting in Bruce’s shadow. Jackie’s ideas and suggestions were always swept aside by Lo Wei, who insisted on doing things his own way. Nevertheless, Jackie continued to make a number of films for Lo Wei in Taiwan, none of which were considered successful.[br /]
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But Jackie finally convinced Lo Wei to let him direct the movie Half a Loaf of Kung Fu in which he applied his ideas and skills of fight choreography. Most significantly, he made the movie with a humorous tone. Lo Wei was so dismayed with the finished product, that he locked away the project. But the movie did surface at a later stage. [br /]
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In 1978, Jackie was ‘lent’ to Ng See Huen’s Seasonal Film Company to make Snake in the Eagle Shadow. Ng See Huen and director Yuen Woo Ping took enormous risk by casting Chan who had no significant hits to his credit, but it turned out that it was a risk definitely worth taking. Unlike Jackie’s previous films, this movie had a hilarious and humorous tone, better acting, and a much better story.[br /]
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[b]The Dawning Star[/b][br /]
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At last freed of the burden to imitate Bruce Lee, Jackie’s expressive features, timing, and comic abilities began to be recognized. The film was a hit in Hong Kong, and the cast and director reunited shortly thereafter to make the even more successful Drunken Master. It broke all box-office records in Hong Kong, and Jackie was given the freedom to develop his own comedy Kung-fu style. The success of this movie gave Jackie more control over his films and he wrote, directed, and choreographed his next and final film for Lo Wei, The Fearless Hyena.[br /]
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With his newfound acclaim, Jackie realized that he had to extricate himself from the meager talents of Lo Wei. He signed up with Raymond Chow’s Golden Harvest film company. This breach of contract angered Lo Wei, who then reportedly issued threats against Jackie’s life. Although details are not available, it appears that Jackie was ‘bought out’ from Lo Wei by Raymond Chaw’s Golden Harvest.[br /]
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In 1980, Jackie made his first film for Golden Harvest, The Young Master. With this film, Jackie retained the clout and control with which he left Lo Wei, and he once again acted as writer and director. His drive and success potential enabled him to quickly find his way to America with Golden Harvest’s backing. Hoping to repeat Bruce Lee’s phenomenal success in the American film industry, Golden Harvest teamed with Warner Brothers and Robert Clause, the director of Enter the Dragon. The result was Battle Creek Brawl, which was later renamed The Big Brawl.[br /]
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Audience response was unenthusiastic, due to several factors. Jackie returned to America twice to play the Japanese race car driver in both Cannonball Run movies (released in 1981 and 1984). It is said that for Cannonball Run, he was booked on the Today Show for publicity of the film, but upon arrival at the studio, he was told that his English was not good enough for him to be interviewed. He was only allowed to give a kung-fu demonstration. Perhaps, Jackie’s lasting souvenir of his participation in the first Cannonball Run was the concept of running out-takes with the end credits. His next film Dragon Lord was the first film in which he incorporated outtakes. This practice has become one of his trademarks. They serve as validation of his genuine performances. [br /]
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However, his first trip to America was not a total waste as he was exposed to film stars of the silent era – Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton. Admiring their talents, timing stunts, he realized that movement and physical control could lead to magnificent action scenes and often communicate better than words. His groundbreaking, Project A, set in turn-of-the-century Hong Kong was a breakthrough from the ‘chopsockies’ (movies set in the old Chinese setting). This movie illustrated the influences Lloyd and Keaton had on Jackie. The film delivered tightly choreographed martial arts, physical humor, and more creative stunt-work. Jackie went so far as to recreate Lloyd’s ‘hanging from the clock tower’ stunt, falling from the third story handcuffed. [br /]
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The fact that he performed these spectacular stunts himself, impressed the audience, and it became another of his trademarks. The film also introduced what would become a third Chan trademark : Jackie singing the closing theme of the film. Since Project A, Jackie has sung most of the end themes for his films.[br /]
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For quite some time after his first ‘American’ episode, Chan decided to concentrate on his primary area of popularity, Asia. Chan’s enormous popularity in Asia added endless confusion and anxiety to his personal life. Once, after he mentioned in an interview that he was dating someone, a Japanese woman threw herself in front of a Bullet train.[br /]
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In another incident, a woman arrived at his office, announcing that she would have his baby, then drank a vial of poison. "I’m very scared," Chan said "because I have a responsibility with all my fans. I cannot say, ‘Now, I have a girlfriend, now I am getting married, now I have a son’. How many people die ? So all those years, my private life, I’m very secret. Very hard for me, but I’d rather hurt one person, one girl, I don’t want to hurt many fans." In general, Chan’s work and family priorities are a bit[br /]
unconventional : "May be my philosophy is different from some other people. Today, most important is work. Relationship with all my staff because they help me. Girl, wife, son, doesn’t help me. So I do everything for public first."[br /]
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In 1985, Jackie Chan made yet another attempt to break into the American market with The Protector. Director James Glickenhaus tried to make Jackie into a Clint Eastwood type character, thereby wasting not only Jackie’s comic abilities but his creativity and martial arts skills. Jackie, who was accustomed to a vital part of all phases of film production, felt restricted by the limitations imposed upon him because of the many unions involved in the Hollywood movie industry. [br /]
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Frustrated and disillusioned with the American style of film making, Jackie re–edited and re–filmed parts of The Protector for its Asian release. Perhaps thinking about how The Protector ‘should’ have been handled, he wrote, directed, and starred in the smash hit Police Story, which is considered the first ‘cop sockie’. He would go on to make two sequels to date. This film was a huge breakthrough as it featured the most dangerous stunts attempted that time. Stunts, which placed and have kept Jackie on the insurance ‘blacklist’ to this day.[br /]
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His next feature film, Armour of God, was to be even more far-reaching in scope, location, and stunts, but it was not without a price. Early in the filming, Jackie wanted a retake of a simple stunt. He was to jump from a castle wall on to another building, using a tree branch for transportation. However, the branch failed to support him and it snapped. He plunged to the ground, hitting his head on a rock. He suffered severe skull fracture and a brain hemorrhage. A grim memento of this mishap is a metal plate covering a hole in his skull. After months of recuperation, the unstoppable Jackie completed the film and went on to churn out more box-office successes, including Dragons Forever and Miracles : The Canton Godfather. All of these films feature fast, superbly choreographed fight scenes and dangerous stunts, cementing Jackie’s position as Hong Kong’s premier action star.[br /]
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[b]Forming His Own Company[/b][br /]
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It was during this period that Jackie took on another challenge. Diversifying his interests in film industry, he formed his own production company, Golden Way. His new company has since produced such highly-acclaimed and award-winning films as Stanley Kwan Kam-Pang’s Rouge, starring Anita Mui Yim-Fong and Leslie Cheung Kwok-Wing, and Actress, starring Maggie Cheung Man-Yuk. This all but proves his devotion and hard work. Chan puts in everything in whatever he undertakes – be it a movie or the reins of an organization.[br /]
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Jackie Chan relates a story wherein his father asks him how long he thought he could continue performing dangerous stunts and making action films. Charles Chan reminded his son that he himself was over 60, retired, and could still do what he had always done : cook. Could Jackie do the same films at 60 ? Jackie conceded that he could not, which is one reason why he is involved in all phases of filmmaking – from scripting to casting to checking locations all the way to dubbing and editing. He is not, however, the only one on his team with this knowledge. Because a stuntman’s career can be short – for any number of reasons – and because Jackie stresses the need for education, he makes certain that his stunt crew learns everything there is to know about filmmaking. When a young man comes to Jackie and expresses his interest to become a stuntman, Jackie eagerly tries to dissuade him from pursuing such a career.[br /]
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He emphasizes that the life of a stuntman is hard and painful and that education is a much better route towards career building. If the young man is persistent and sincere, and if he exhibits potential, he may be accepted onto the team. But the newcomer must understand he is there to learn. [br /]
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[b]Jackie [/b] doesn’t teach them just to fight; he teaches them film-fighting techniques, camera angles, distance, movement, how to react, how to fall and timing. They learn the rhythm and tempo that are so important to Jackie’s films. With experience, they learn how to incorporate these factors into their own choreography. Film-fights and action co-ordination are not all that Jackie teaches his stuntmen. He teaches them everything about the process of bringing a film to life so that, if a stuntman must choose a different career, he could apply his knowledge of various aspects of film-making and can select the best for himself.[br /]
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[b]Compassion For Stuntmen[/b][br /]
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When Jackie made Police Story, it is said that so many stuntmen were injured that none agreed to work with him again. Thinking of the future and welfare of his trusted and loyal ‘stunt monkeys’ in mind, Jackie formed his association called Jackie Chan Stuntman Association. Set up as a type of [br /]
apprenticeship program, and because no one will insure them, Jackie even offers medical benefits to those whom he accepts. Taking one step further, he became a founding member of the Hong Kong Stuntman Association, an organization he felt was necessary to help all stuntmen in the Hong Kong film industry. Many times, when a Jackie Chan film is nominated for Best Action Design by the Hong Kong Film Awards, it is the Jackie Chan Stuntman Association that is nominated and shares the recognition and the award.[br /]
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Jackie continued to top the Asian box-offices throughout the 1990s. Despite increased competition from other Hong Kong and American films, Jackie’s films took a different direction – including teaming up with action star Michelle Khan (Yeoh) in Supercop : Police Story 3 and taking more dramatic turn in the Crime Story.[br /]
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In 1994, Jackie starred in Drunken Master II, a sequel, which returned him to his early film-making days. The final fight scene took months to film, and the result was spectacular. This film was a tremendously bold, more so as ‘chopsockies’ were considered all but dead at that time. In fact, Chan himself had helped eradicate the genre with Project A. However, it has been said that each generation [br /]
reinterprets or re-invents Wong Fei Hung. Ever the innovator, Jackie injected his own special excitement into the Wong Fei Hung legend and once again broke all box-office records for Hong Kong. Taking a chance on Chan, the American film company New Line Cinema bought the rights to distribute Jackie’s next film in the US.[br /]
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[b]Storming American Screen[/b][br /]
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Rumble in the Bronx, Jackie’s 1995 Chinese New Year offering, opened in America in February 1996. Heavily promoted by New Line, the film received excellent reviews and reached #1 at the box-office the week it was released. The film created a huge impact, finally exposing the American public to Jackie and to martial arts and action filmmaking of the caliber they had never seen before. Jackie won legions of new fans.[br /]
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He had finally broken into the American market. He was on his way to becoming a household name in America, not because of a purely Hollywood vehicle but on the strength of a Jackie Chan film backed with Hollywood marketing. Following the success of ‘Rumble’, New Line bought the rights to Chan’s successive works, while another American film company, Miramax, bought up Jackie’s recent 1990s work to distribute in the US. After a lifetime in films, Jackie has developed his own unique style, impossible to successfully capture in words and visible only in the endearing yet breathtaking magic of his films. Regarding his place in film history, Jackie wants to be remembered as people remember Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, and Gene Kelly, who mesmerized people with their extraordinary rhythm. [br /]
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When American reviewers attempt to find some parallel for the graceful poetry of Chan’s acrobatic scenes, they usually cite Fred Astaire. But the most often significant comparison made by US pundits is to Bruce Lee, who had worked equally hard to gain a foothold in the Hollywood star scenario.[br /]
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Talking about the Hollywood scenario it must be mentioned that, on Jackie’s home turf, he always wins over Hollywood. For example, when Chan’s Thunderbolt was released in Hong Kong, Warner’s Batman Forever had been running for five weeks and was the territory’s top-grossing film. By the time, Batman Forever was in its seventh week of release, Thunderbolt had already outgrossed it; Chan had overtaken the caped crusader as Hong Kong’s box-office champ in just 12 days. This clearly shows the ratio of popularity Chan enjoys when compared to foreign films in his territory.[br /]
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Although, even in America, Chan is not without a distinguished care of support. American action luminaries like Bruce Willis routinely seek him out to pay homage to him during his visits. In 1993, long-time fan, Sylvester Stallone publicly tipped his hat to Chan in Demolition Man when co-star Sandra Bullock explained an unexpected display of martial arts prowess by citing her love for "Jackie Chan Movies." Perhaps, the highest tribute came when Hong Kong action fan and Hollywood star Quentin Tarantino was asked to participate in the 1995 MTV Awards. Reportedly, Tarantino gave MTV just two conditions : that Jackie Chan receives the Lifetime Achievement Award, and that Tarantino himself be selected as the presenter.[br /]
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Like all great popular artistes, Chan’s main concern is finding the widest audience possible for his work; He is a staunch workaholic and over the years, Jackie has worked on his various martial arts skills so much that now, even accomplished martial artists fumble in recognizing his moves. In his early films, he almost exclusively used Sil Lum (Shaolin) style that he learned at the Peking Opera School. He especially uses the Snake, the Crane, and the Dragon styles. He also utilized the "Drunken Fist" technique in Drunken Master and Drunken Master II.[br /]
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[b]Jackie’s [/b] later works emphasize his speed and acrobatic abilities. His flashy high kicks come from his study of Hapkido, the martial arts technique and his quick blocks and punches are characteristic of Wing Chun, a martial arts style. His study of Karate and boxing, are also combined and improvised into a very unique and personal style. Jackie, reportedly has said that if he wanted to, he could develop his own unique fighting system, as Bruce Lee did with Jeet Kune Do, a fighting technique developed by him.[br /]
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[b]Off-screen Role[/b][br /]
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[b]Jackie’s [/b] love life has always been kept low-profile. It is said that he had kept his marriage a secret for a long time. His wife, Lin Feng-Jiao bore him a son named Jackson. Later on, they separated due to unknown reasons. It is also said that he was in love with Teresa Teng, an actress, who died of asthma in 1995, at the age of 43. This always cheerful and optimistic man has never displayed any sign of depression. Let’s hope that this Oriental Jewel continues to sparkle over Asia and over the world for a long time.[br /]
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[b]Hats off to you, Jackie !! [/b] [br /]
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[b]Jackie Chan[/b] has, suffered various injuries during the shooting of his films. Below is a list of injuries and names of the movies in which he suffered.[br /]
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[b]HEAD AND FACE INJURIES[/b][br /]
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Brain hemorrhage and cracked skull – Armor of God, 1986[br /]

Broken nose – Dragon Fist, 1978[br /]

Concussion – Hand of Death, 1975[br /]

Front tooth was kicked out by Hwang Jang –[br /]
Lee - Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow.[br /]

Broken nose and almost suffocated – Young Master, 1980[br /]

Injured his chin – Dragon Lord 1982[br /]

Cheek bone dislocated – Police Story 3 : Supercop, 1993.[br /]
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[b]HAND INJURIES[/b][br /]
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Left ankle broken – Rumble in the Bronx, 1995 [br /]

Impacted ankle – Dragons Forever, 1987.[br /]

Bones in his hand and finger were injured – The Protector, 1985. [br /]

Broken finger – Project A, 1983.[br /]
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[b]LEG INJURIES[/b]

Puncture wound in Leg – Armor of God II, 1991.[br /]

Broken instep on his foot - knee was injured while skateboarding – City Hunter, 1992.[br /]

Injured his legs when caught between two cars – Crime Story, 1993[br /]
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[b]BODY INJURIES[/b][br /]
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(1) Neck bone injury – Project A, 1983[br /]

(2) Broken hip – Magnificent Bodyguards, 1978[br /]

(3) 7th and 8th bones in vertebrae injured – Pelvis dislocated – Scraped skin while sliding down a Christmas light covered pole – Police Story, 1985.[br /]

(4) Dislocated chest bone – Armor of God II, 1991.[br /]

(5) Glass shards in his rear – Twin Dragons, 1991. [br /]

(6) Broken shoulder and a deep bruise on his back – Police Story 3; Supercop, 1993.[br /]

(7) Burns – Drunken Master II, 1994.[br /]

(8) Injured neck bone – Mr. Nice Guy, 1997.[br /]


(9) Back injury so severe that the doctor warned him that another similar injury may cause him to be paralyzed for life - Accidental Spy, 2001.[br /]
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[b]Jackie Chan,[/b] a name that instantly conjures up a funny, energetic, and amazingly talented personality. His stunning acrobatics, astute synchronization, and his unique rhythmic fights stand unsurpassable in the Hong Kong film industry. But the most significant factor – the key to Chan’s success are his unbelievable, death-defying, mind-blowing stunts.[br /]
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Born in poverty, Chan began his career as a simple stuntman and an extra, gradually rising to become a superstar. But even today, being one of the richest entertainers did not prevent him from performing his unmatched stunts himself, which remains his trademark. Jackie has acquired a position in the Hong Kong entertainment landscape that only one other martial artist has previously held : the fierce and formidable, Bruce Lee. But Chan, to distinguish himself, created a lighter, funnier image as compared to the angry and lethal persona that Lee created of a martial arts hero. He succeeded. [br /]
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Today, Jackie is known for the funny, vulnerable, and acrobatic character that is a far away from the image of Bruce Lee. Jackie does not think that he is perfect. His stunts have sometimes been miscalculated and he has on more than one occasion stared death in the face. But that does not prevent this lively and cheerful Asian to stop doing his stunts himself.[br /]
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Jackie Chan stands out in the Hong Kong film industry as not only a talented artist but also as a good human being and a philanthropist. He has helped many less fortunate fellow Hong Kong residents to lead a better life, and also extended his helping hand to people across the ocean to America.[br /]
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Jackie Chan is truly an example of what can be achieved through dedication, hard work, and belief in one’s self.[br /]
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• 1954 Jackie Chan was born.[br /]
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• 1955-60 Jackie spent his early childhood with parents in Australia.[br /]
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• 1961 Jackie’s parents brought him to Hong Kong to be indentured to the Peking Opera School.[br /]
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• 1962 He became part of a student performance group called "The Group of the Seven Little Fortunes".[br /]

Made his debut at 8 in the Cantonese feature Big And Little Wong Tin Bar.[br /]
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• 1963-70 Continued his grueling studies at the school; learned acting, singing, dancing, miming, acrobatics and a variety of martial arts.[br /]
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• 1971 He graduated and rejoined his parents in Australia. Returned to Hong Kong and began working as stuntman, fighter, and extra.[br /]
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• 1972 Successfully executed what is reputedly known as the highest stunt fall ever attempted in Asian cinema.[br /]
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• 1973 Worked as martial arts director in The Heroine in which he also played the second male lead.[br /]
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• 1974 His first film as hero was released, The Little Tiger of Guandong.[br /]
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• 1975 Appeared in Hand of Death, directed by John Woo.[br /]
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• 1976 Stared in six kung-fu movies for Lo Wei, former Bruce Lee filmmaker.[br /]
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• 1977 Starred in first comedy, Half A Loaf of Kung Fu, which was shelved for two years.[br /]
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• 1978 Starred in landmark Kung-fu comedy, Drunken Master, one of the first Hong Kong films to break into the Japanese market.[br /]
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• 1980 American film debut in Golden Harvest’s The Big Brawl with Jose Ferrier.[br /]
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• 1983 Project A, considered to be his finest film, was released.[br /]
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• 1984 Appeared in the American action-comedy Cannonball Run II.[br /]
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• 1985 Directed and starred in Police Story, which was later screened at the New York Film Festival.[br /]
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• 1986 Suffered severe skull injury during the shooting of Armor of God.[br /]
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• 1987 Started his own production company, Golden Way, and began producing films with Golden Harvest’s Raymond Chow.[br /]
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• 1989 Turned down the offer from Michael Douglas to co-star as villain in Ridley Scott’s Black Rain.[br /]
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• 1992 Jackie led more than 300 people to march on Hong Kong’s police headquarters to protest the powerful local influence of the Triad (organized crime).[br /]
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• 1993 Played a rare dramatic role in Crime Story, a crime melodrama.[br /]
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• 1994 Returned to the "chopsockie" genre with Drunken Master II.[br /]
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• 1995 Received MTV Movie Award for Lifetime Achievement.[br /]
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• 1996 Re-launched his US movie career with Rumble in the Bronx which is the first English language film over which Jackie had complete creative control.[br /]
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• 1997 Starred in First Strike. [br /]
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• 1998 Release of Mr. Nice Guy and Rush Hour with comedian Chris Tucker.[br /]
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• 2000 His first cowboy movie Shanghai Noon with Owen Wilson. [br /]
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• 2001 His most recent films Accidental Spy and Rush Hour 2 are released.[br /]
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Names of movies that Jackie has worked in. In later movies he has also worked in the making of the film in one way or the other. [br /]
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• 1971 The Little Tiger from Guandong[br /]
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• 1973 Enter the Dragon (cameo)[br /]
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• 1975 Hand of Death[br /]
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• 1976 New Fist of Fury
Shaolin Wooden Men [br /]
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• 1977 Snake and Crane arts of Shaolin
To Kill With Intrigue
Killer Meteors
Half a Loaf of Kung
Eagle Shadow Fist[br /]
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• 1978
Dragon Fist
Drunken Master
Magnificent Bodyguards
Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow
Spiritual Kung - Fu [br /]
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• 1979
Fantasy Mission Force
The Fearless Hyena [br /]
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• 1980
The Big Brawl
The Fearless Hyena II – Director, stunt coordination and writer.
The Young Master – Director / Stunt coordination[br /]
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• 1981
The Cannonball Run[br /]
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• 1982
Dragon Lord
Marvelous Fist[br /]
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• 1983
Kung Fu Girl
Project A : Director / Writer
Winners and Sinners[br /]
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• 1984
Wheels on Meals
Cannonball Run II [br /]
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• 1985
Twinkle, Twinkle, Lucky Stars
The Protector
Police Story
My Lucky Stars
Heart of the Dragon [br /]
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•1987
Armour of God – Director
Project A II – Director [br /]
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• 1988 Police Story II – Director / Writer
Dragons Forever – Producer[br /]
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• 1989 Miracles – Director / Writer[br /]
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• 1990
Island of Fire
Rouge – Producer [br /]
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• 1991
Armour of God II – Stunt coordination [br /]
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• 1992
City Hunter – Stunt Coordination
Police Story III – Producer
The Twin Dragons – Stunt coordination[br /]
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• 1993
Once a Cop – Producer
Crime Story[br /]
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• 1994
Drunken Master II [br /]
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• 1995
Thunderbolt
Rumble in Bronx – Stunt coordination [br /]
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• 1996
First Strike – Director / Producer[br /]
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• 1997
Mr. Nice Guy[br /]
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• 1998
Who Am I ?
Rush Hour – Producer[br /]
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• 1999
Gorgeous – Producer[br /]
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• 2000 Shanghai Noon- Executive Producer[br /]
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• 2001
Rush Hour 2 – Producer
The Accidental Spy – Producer[br /]
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• Do not let your circumstances change you. You change your circumstances.[br /]
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• People keep coming up and congratulating me, but I say what I always say "Wow ! Finished. What’s next ?[br /]
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• I just cannot stop. I just continue[br /]
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• I have a hole in my head with a plastic plug to keep my brains in (Laughs). It vibrates when I hum. [br /]
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I use one shot … That’s my trademark." – Talking about his stunts.

• I eat everything. Most important is training." When asked if he is calorie conscious. [br /]
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• I hated you. I feared you, I Love you, Master" – dedicated to his Master, Yu Chan Yuen. [br /]
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Chan was a stuntman in the Bruce Lee classic Enter the Dragon (1973)... Chan is also the star of the television cartoon for kids, Jackie Chan Adventures.
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