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Detail of Biography - John McEnroe
Name :
John McEnroe
Date :
Views :
440
Category :
Birth Date :
16/02/2059
Birth Place :
Wiesbaden, Germany
Death Date :
Not Available
Biography - John McEnroe
Not Available
[b]Birth and Family History[/b][br /]
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John Patrick McEnroe was born on February 16, 1959, at the US Air Base Hospital in Wiesbaden, Germany. His father, John McEnroe Sr, was in the United States Air Force, while his mother Kay McEnroe was registered as a surgical nurse. John Sr was born in the depression era and was a first generation Irish–American. John Sr, was a graduate of the Catholic University of Washington. He was determined to become a lawyer. To support his family, he worked in advertising during day time, while attending the Fordham University at night to study law. He used to lead a tough life as he did not get home before 10’ o’clock and then he studied for the classes the next day and had to make it to work in the morning. John Sr and Kay had two more sons, Mark, born on February 2, 1962 and Patrick, born on July 1, 1966. Though Kay was a registered surgical nurse, the three boys kept her occupied for the whole day. John Sr eventually became a partner in law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton and Garrison.[br /]
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[b]Childhood[/b][br /]
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John Jr was just nine months old when his family shifted back to New York. John exhibited a well-developed eye-hand coordination and athletic ability from an early age. According to his father, he could hit a ball with a plastic bat when he was only two years old and could hit it to a considerable distance at the age of four. In 1963, the McEnroes moved to Douglaston, Queens, New York, where he spent most of his childhood.[br /]
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Early Schooling[br /]
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John had his elementary education at Buckley Country Day School where he got good grades. He then moved on to Trinity School, a prestigious and expensive preparatory school in Manhattan. According to his mother, John was a competitor in the class and wanted the best marks. He worked hard for this. He had a pretty hectic schedule. At 7.20 am, he took the train to Manhattan and his school would start at 8.20 am. He would be free at 4.10 pm, play sport and get back home at 7.15 pm. He would have his dinner and then study.[br /]
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At Trinity, he was known as a funny, witty and rowdy child. His days at Trinity turned him into a tough, street-fighter kid. Scholastically, he was an above average student but could have done better if it was not for his sporting activities. He played soccer and tennis for four years and basketball for two years.[br /]
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[b]First Brush with Tennis[/b][br /]
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[b]The McEnroes lived just two blocks away from the Douglaston Club on Little Neck Bay, a quiet suburb of New York. The McEnroes had joined the club for its social values when John was 10. But very soon, John and his father, followed by Patrick and Mark, discovered the tennis courts.
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[b]The very first racquet that John used had been discarded by Frank Prior, a family friend. The first one that his father brought for him was from a discount store. John used these racquets in the club for the first couple of years. Finding John’s talents promising, Dan Dwyer and George Seewagen Sr, the pros at the club, advised the McEnroes to develop his talents. So John Jr approached Antonio (Tony) Palafox at the Port Washington Tennis Academy and started training under him. John remained under Tony’s tutorship for six years.
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[b]Harry Hopman, a former Australian Davis Cup coach helped Tony at Port Washington and later took over as John’s coach.[/b][br /]
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John went to the first nationals when he was just 11 years old. He had just one racquet and was given Mark’s racquet in case he lost his own racquet. The first major tournament where he participated was the twelve-and-under tournament. He surprised everyone by reaching the semi-finals. Though he lost the match, but only a month later he recorded his first tournament victory.[br /]
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According to coach Palafox, John’s concentration was the main thing that put him a cut above the other children. Palafox had also said that : "John had to learn to control his emotional outbursts. Many people failed to realize that the outbursts were a result of his concentration and would get angry when things did not go right. The other kids had more talents but could not do the things that John could do.[br /]
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His juniors had noticed many a times that young McEnroe came off the court almost in tears, as if he had lost a match. If there was anything that could cool his temper, then it had to be his suspension in the early days when he desperately wanted to prove himself by winning matches. At the age of 16, John was suspended for a period of six months for a prank from the Port Washington Tennis Academy. This forced his parents to move the talented McEnroe to the cove Racquet Club, where Palafox had moved as a coach.[br /]
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In 1976, John took part in the Orange Bowl World Junior Championships, for players from 12 to 18, and won it. In 1977, John graduated from the Trinity Preparatory High School. In the same year, he won the mixed doubles event at the French Open with his childhood friend, Mary Carillo. Due to his spectacular performance Tennis magazine voted him as the ‘Rookie of the Year’.[br /]
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Then John qualified for Wimbledon and after losing in the juniors category, he concentrated on the men’s singles. He surprised everyone by reaching the semi-finals. In the semifinals, he faced Jimmy Connors. Connors defeated McEnroe in the semis, 6–3, 6–3, 4–6, 6–4. It was a major tournament record for a qualifier.[br /]
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After graduating form Trinity, John joined Stanford University. John had been offered one of Stanford’s five full scholarships in 1978 and he readily accepted it.[br /]
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[b]John at Stanford[/b][br /]
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The Stanford University was established in 1891 as a memorial to the founder, Leland Stanford’s only son who died at the age of 16. It is spread over 8,000 acres of rolling hills, golden fields, wooded retreats, streams and lakes The central feature of the college is a huge courtyard with open arched corridors. It also has a beautiful church decorated with bright mural paintings, adjacent to the courtyard. It has a good reputation in sports, as well as has the finest medical, business and law schools. It was in such a beautiful and serene atmosphere in which John stepped in, in 1978. But John did not like the wet climate of California and had said with distaste : "There was a lot of rain. It would rain 35 days in a row and the temperature change was amazing. In the morning it would be 80°F, by three o’clock it would be 85°F and then at night the temperature dropped to 40°s. I used to get a lot of colds."[br /]
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Like all other kids in America, John did not have to appear for the scholastic Aptitude Tests to get admission in Stanford. He was a B student with an above average report, but his being good at tennis helped him to easily enter Stanford as he was offered one of the Stanford’s five full scholarships. John was not sure till about January ’78 as to when would he turn a pro.[br /]
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John was a conscientious worker, a sign of a perfectionist. He always strived to do everything to the best of his ability. Many a times, he would take night classes once or twice a week. So that his lectures would finish early and he would spend the afternoon playing tennis. His hard work paid him rich dividends during his career as a professional.[br /]
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In the same year, John led his tennis team to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Championship. He also won the NCAA Championship by defeating John Sadri of North Carolina, as a freshman. McEnroe defeated Sadri 7–6, 7–6, 5–7, 7–6, in what proved to be one of the greatest matches in college tennis. The match lasted four hours and the aggregate total point difference of the two was just one (McEnroe – 144 and Sadri – 143).[br /]
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Later that year he joined the pro circuit. In the summer of ’78, McEnroe was eliminated in the first round at Wimbledon but reached the Semi-finals of the US Open. By the end of ’78, he was ranked sixth in the world in singles and fifth in doubles. It was during this time that McEnroe began his long-term commitment to playing in the Davis Cup. By now McEnroe had truly and surely arrived on the tennis scene.[br /]
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McEnroe and Davis Cup[br /]
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The Davis Cup has always been important to McEnroe. During the Spring Term of his final year at Trinity, he traveled with the Junior Davis Cup squad. In 1978, McEnroe represented the US in Davis Cup for the first time as a member of the senior squad against Chile in Santiago. The then Davis Cup coach, Tony Trabert took a risk by selecting McEnroe to play the finals against England. McEnroe justified his selection. He handled the pressure well and won both his matches. The 19-year-old McEnroe helped the US to a 4-1 victory over England.[br /]
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McEnroe revived the American interest in the Davis Cup that had once been shunned by Jimmy Connors. He said that he had promised his mother that he would play for his country if he was asked to. Right from the start he gave US the Cup that belonged to other countries since 1973. McEnroe continued to be the main player of the US Davis Cup team helping them to win four more Cups in 1979, 1981, 1982 and 1992. He set numerous records in the Davis Cup. He has played Davis Cup for 12 years, with 41 wins in singles and 18 wins in doubles for an aggregate of 59 wins in the Davis Cup. He has played both singles and doubles for 13 years and has won 14 of the 15 Cups doubles together with Peter Fleming.[br /]
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[b]ATP Recognition[/b][br /]
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In the four months that followed his first Davis Cup victory, McEnroe won four singles championships including a victory over Bjorn Borg in Stockholm, Sweden. The Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) honored him with a ‘Newcomer of the Year Award’ and ranked him number four in the world, behind Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors and Vitas Gerulaitis. In his first six months as a pro, he earned nearly half a million dollars.[br /]
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In 1979, McEnroe was one of the best players in the world. That year, he captured major titles like Volvo Masters in Madison Square, WTC Dallas, Wimbledon doubles title and the US open singles and doubles titles. In all, McEnroe won 10 singles titles and 16 doubles titles with Peter Fleming as his partner. By winning the US open beating Vitas Gerulaitis in straight sets, he became the youngest winner in 31 years at the age of 20.[br /]
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After decisive victories over both Connors and Borg in 1979, the playing style of McEnroe matured. His style proved to be an interesting contrast to the machine-gun like attacks of Connors and Borg. McEnroe used finesse to keep his opponents off guard just like his idol, Rod Laver. His serve did not overpower his opponents, but his extremely quick reflexes and his instinct of placing his shots used to fox his opponents.[br /]
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As the attention of the public turned towards his talents, so did his reputation for bad conduct spread. People who were not interested in tennis were attending his matches to witness the flaring of his renowned temper. The games began to get more rowdier. The population shouted their hatred of McEnroe and began to great his court appearance with boos and jibes. At no tournament did his disruptive actions stand out more than they did at Wimbledon. It would not be incorrect to say that the All England Club and the British fans were happy to see McEnroe lose in the fourth round of the 1979 Wimbledon tournament. Later that year he led the US Davis Cup team to victory over Argentina, Australia and Italy, there by retaining the Davis Cup. At the end of the year, McEnroe had been ranked as No. 3 in the world in the ATP rankings.
The Roaring 80s[br /]
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The year 1980 saw one of the most notorious rivalries between McEnroe and Borg. It all began in July at the Wimbledon finals. In the first set, Borg played erratically. But in the next four sets, both players showed top form. The highlight of the match was the fourth set, which was decided on a tiebreaker. McEnroe finally won the set, but it took him 22 minutes and 34 points. In the end, Borg emerged victorious. The score read 1–6, 7–5, 6–3, 6–7, 8–6. This victory earned Borg his fifth consecutive Wimbledon title, but it also proved the McEnroe had the necessary stamina and mental toughness to be a top ranking player.[br /]
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McEnroe and Borg met again at the US Open finals. McEnroe was defending the title against a determined Borg, who had not yet won the US Open. The Borg–McEnroe duel at the US Open was in many ways similar to the Wimbledon finals earlier that year. McEnroe defeated Borg 7–6, 6–1, 6–7, 5–7, 6–4. The match lasted four hours and 13 minutes, 20 minutes longer than the Wimbledon final.[br /]
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Wimbledon ’81 [br /]
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The 1981 Wimbledon final again had Borg and McEnroe as opponents. But this time, McEnroe defeated the defending champion in four sets (4–6, 7–6, 7–6, 6–4) ending his five-year reign spanning 41 matches. But the Wimbledon finals became famous for wrong reasons. Two phrases uttered by McEnroe during the tournament achieved a sort of immortality. ‘You cannot be serious’ and ‘you’ve got to be the pits of the world’ are the phrases that have been included in the Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations, thereby becoming immortal. Had they been said by anyone else at any sporting event, they would not have gained such a recognition. ‘You cannot be serious’ is found the Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations with the explanation : "Said to a tennis umpire by John McEnroe at Wimbledon, early 1980s."[br /]
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The same year, in the US Open, McEnroe defended his title. He defeated Borg 4–6, 6–2, 6–4, 6–3. Borg retired after the defeat at the US Open, perhaps with a feeling that his reign was over. McEnroe failed to win any major tournaments in 1982. The year also saw an epic battle lasting six hours and 22 minutes in the Davis Cup quarterfinals. McEnroe defeated Mats Wilander giving the US a 3–2 victory over Sweden. But he was back in top form the next year. He won his second Wimbledon defeating Chris Lewis in straight sets (6–2, 6–2, 6–2). He also achieved his 28th singles victory in Davis Cup. Despite his inconsistent performance, McEnroe was ranked as No. 1 player by ATP from 1981 to 1984. In 1983, he also won the Doubles event at the US Open and Wimbledon.[br /]
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[b]McEnroe at his Devastating Best[/b][br /]
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The year 1984 saw McEnroe at the peak of his career. He was in a devastating form that year as he just blew away the competition winning 82 of the 85 matches he played. He won 13 tournaments that year including the Wimbledon and US Opens. He lost the French Open finals, despite leading by two sets. This loss ended McEnroe’s 39-match winning streak and it was the closest he ever reached to winning the French Open Championship. In the Wimbledon finals, McEnroe ruthlessly destroyed Connors game plan defeating him in straight sets 6–1, 6–1, 6–2. Jimmy Connors, who had earned a reputation as one of the greatest returner of the game, had no answer for the slicing serves of McEnroe. McEnroe got 78 per cent of his first serves in and most of them were unreturned. His angled volleys were sharper, the drop shots deadlier and he placed the serve more meticulously than ever before. He committed only two unforced errors during the entire match. This was the third Wimbledon title for McEnroe. Later that year he also won the US Open, his fourth, beating Ivan Lendl 6–3, 6–4, 6–1. This victory marked the last Grand Slam title of his career.[br /]
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[b]McEnroe and Fleming[/b][br /]
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John McEnroe and Peter Fleming proved to be the greatest doubles pair US ever had. They were the ATP Doubles Team of the year in 1979 and 1981. They won the Wimbledon four times (1979, 1981, 1983 and 1984) and the US Open thrice (1979, 1981, 1983). McEnroe and Fleming won 14 of the 15 Cups doubles together.[br /]
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[b]McEnroe’s Decline[/b][br /]
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After winning seven Grand Slam singles and seven Grand Slam doubles titles and being ranked number one in the ATP year-end rankings from 1981 to 1984, McEnroe’s decline began from 1985. In 1985, he won eight singles titles, but none of them were Grand Slams. Several factors contributed to McEnroe’s decline. Firstly, McEnroe was notorious for neglecting his training. Secondly, may be his tantrums also contributed to his fall. In 1987, McEnroe took a seven-month break from the game following the US Open, where he was suspended for two months and fined $17,500 for misconduct and verbal abuse. He was defaulted from the 1990 Australian Open for bouncing his racquet and yelling obscenities. It happened at a time when he seemed to have regained control over the game.[br /]
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[b]McEnroe – Tying the Nuptial Knot[/b][br /]
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McEnroe took a sabbatical in 1986 and married Tatum O’Neil, his girlfriend on August 1, 1986. The two had met in 1984. Both of them were of the same temperament. The press had dubbed them, ‘Tantrum and McBrat’ after McEnroe had addressed her as ‘The female John McEnroe.’ O’Neil had barred her father, the hot-tempered Ryan O’Neil from the wedding when rumors about her father calling McEnroe ‘a jerk’ were afloat. They then retreated to his Malibu, California, home that he had purchased for $1 million. The couple had three children – two sons and one daughter. Their son, Kevin was born on May 23, two months before their marriage. Son, Sean was born on September 23, 1987 while daughter Emily was born on May 10, 1991.[br /]
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[b]Divorce[/b][br /]
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McEnroe divorced O’Neil in 1992, ostensibly because she wanted to work and McEnroe wanted her home with the kids. After the divorce, O’Neil told Entertainment Weekly, "I’ve had a lot of experience with men who are bullies. Taking one McEnroe was the biggest struggle of my life." In 1994, they reached a divorce settlement worth $4.5 million.[br /]
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Last Spurt on the Court[br /]
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In 1992, McEnroe, at 33, entered Wimbledon as an unseeded player, ranked No. 30. On his way to the semis, he had beaten 16th seed Davit Wheaton and Pat Cash. His clash with Pat Cash was dubbed as ‘battle of champions’ and it lasted four hours and nine minutes. In the semifinal, he inflicted a stunning defeat to ninth seed Guy Forget, 6–2, 7–6 (11–9), 6–3. In the finals, McEnroe faced Andre Agassi. Agassi proved to be too much for McEnroe and won 6–4, 6–2, 6–3. But this was not the end. Two days later, McEnroe claimed his fifth Wimbledon doubles title with Michael Stich as his partner. The American-German pair defeated Richey Renbeberg and Jim Grabb 5–7, 7–6 (7–5), 3–6, 7–6(7-5), 19–17, a record for a final lasting five hours and one minute.[br /]
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[b]Later that year, while his marriage was crumbling, he reached the semifinals of the US Open and led the United States to a rousing win in the Davis Cup over Switzerland.[/b][br /]
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[b]Debut on the Senior Circuit[/b][br /]
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McEnroe made his Worldwide Senior Tennis Circuit (WSTC) debut in 1995 by winning the Moscow Championships. In the 1998-99 season, McEnroe established himself as a player to beat. He won eight events that season, and became the first person other than Connors to end the season as the top player on the WSTC. The next year, he again finished as No. 1. That year he won five of the six tournaments he took part in. he had to withdraw from the Masters that year due to the possible premature birth of his child. In five years since his debut in the WSTC, he has won 20 WSTC titles in 11 countries and five continents.[br /]
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[b]Remarriage[/b][br /]
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In April 1997, McEnroe remarried Patty Smyth, a musician, who sang the 1984 hit, ‘The Warrior.’ The couple has two daughters, Anna born on December 27, 1995 and Eva born in April 99.[br /]
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[b]The Other Side of McEnroe[/b][br /]
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Tennis is not the end for McEnroe. He has enjoyed a wide range of activities. He is an avid rock fan and his foray into rock ’n’ roll introduced him to Patty Smyth, his current wife. He is also a guitar player and occasionally plays at charity events. Eric Clapton taught him to play guitar. He had even formed a band and had begun working on an album, but he left it unfinished probably because of a combination of fear of success and fear of failure.[br /]
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Turning A New Leaf[br /]
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In 1995, McEnroe began his career as a television commentator for NBC and CBS at the US Open, the French Open and at Wimbledon. Now a days he competes in a select number of tournaments and special events, but largely for charity. Most of his charity work targets children’s causes and he devotes time to the Arthur Ashe foundation for the defeat of AIDS. His interest in art led him to open the John McEnroe Art Gallery in New York City, which features up-and-coming young artists. At the opening of the Gallery, McEnroe said : "There are a couple of connections between art and tennis. People in the art business have a tendency to one day tell you that you’re the greatest artist that ever lived and the next second make you wonder if you’ll ever sell a piece of art again.[br /]
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[b]So I think I have a knowledge of that, because you have a fear when you go on the court : fear of failure… understand [artists] are needy and insecure."[/b][br /]
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[b]In 1997, the National Father’s Day Committee, a New York non-profit organization, named McEnroe as the Father of the Year. When McEnroe is not playing on the circuit, he can be found every morning walking his nine-year-old daughter Emily to School. He had told Sports Illustrated in 1996, "By having kids, I got my humanity back. I’d been like some tennis dude, No. 1 in the world and not happy with it."[/b][br /]
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[b]In September 1999, McEnroe was named captain of the US Davis Cup team, but after the United States lost to Spain in the semifinals in July 2000, he resigned, citing frustrations with the tournament format and his inability to convince top players such as Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras to play for US in the Davis Cup.[/b][br /]
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[b]His lack of single-minded devotion may have halted his tennis career, but his charitable activities have brought him to the public eye, a side of McEnroe, that was never seen during his reign as a champion.[/b][br /]
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McEnroe, is perhaps the most skilled and yet the most controversial of all players. He played brilliantly in both singles and doubles and was distinguished by his shot making artistry and volatile temper. A magnificent volleyer with a feathery touch, he was an attacker too. His combination of talent and temperament worked hand in hand, exploding on the court and turning tennis into a performance art.[br /]
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The following lines from Peter Levi’s "The Life and Times of William Shakespeare", aptly describe the tennis great :[br /]
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The origin of all lay in his unsociable, supercilious and self-willed disposition, which in all cases is offensive to most people; and when combined with a passion for distinction passes into absolute savageness and mercilessness… Such are the faulty parts of his character, which in all other respects is a noble one.[br /]
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[br /]

[b]February 16, 1959[/b][br /]

John McEnroe was born in Wiesbaden, Germany.[br /]
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[b]November 1959[/b][br /]

The McEnroes returned to the US.[br /]
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[b]1963[/b][br /]

The McEnroes moved to Douglaston, New York.[br /]
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[b]1970[/b][br /]

John was placed under the training of Tony Palafox at the Port Washington Tennis Academy.[br /]
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[b]1972[/b][br /]

Joined the Trinity Preparatory High School in Manhattan, New York.[br /]
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[b]1977[/b][br /]

Graduated from High School.
Won the mixed double’s event at French Open with Mary Carillo.
Voted as Rookie of the Year by Tennis magazine.[br /]
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[b]1978[/b][br /]

Joined the Stanford University.
Won the NCAA Championship.
Joined the pro circuit later that year.
Was bestowed the Newcomer of the Year Award by ATP.[br /]
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[b]1979[/b][br /]

Won his first Grand Slam – the US Open.
Won the Wimbledon doubles pairing with Peter Fleming.[br /]
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[b]March 1980[/b][br /]

Became the youngest player in history to be ranked No 1 at 21 years, 15 days.[br /]
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[b]1981[/b][br /]

Won the Wimbledon singles and doubles.
Won the US Open Doubles.[br /]
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[b]1984[/b][br /]

Won his last Grand Slam.[br /]
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[b]August 1, 1986[/b][br /]

Married actress Tatum O’Neil.[br /]
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[b]1992[/b][br /]

Divorced Tatum O’Neil.[br /]
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[b]1994[/b][br /]

Reached a divorce settlement with O’Neil.[br /]
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[b]1995[/b][br /]

Made his debut in WSTC.[br /]
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[b]April 1997[/b][br /]

Married Patty Smyth.[br /]
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[b]1999[/b][br /]

Became No 1 in WSTC rankings.[br /]
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[b]July 10, 1999[/b][br /]

Was enshrined in the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport.[br /]
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September 1999
Named the Captain and Coach of the US Davis Cup team.

[b]July 2000[/b][br /]

Resigned as the Captain and Coach of the US Davis Cup team.[br /]
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Not Available
• I have this unique ability to turn the whole crowd around.[br /]
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• By having kids, I got my humanity back. I’d been like some tennis dude, No 1 in the world and not happy with it.[br /]
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• I’ll let the racket do the talking.[br /]
[br /]
• I think it’s the mark of a great player to be confident in tough situations.[br /]
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• [b]On First Day of Wimbledon[/b] [br /]

"I know I’ve arrived ! First at the BBC, then at Buckingham Palace."[br /]
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• [b]On Sibling Rivalry[/b][br /]
"My kid brother always got the ice cream – that’s ok, I always got the title."[br /]
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• [b]On Buckingham Palace[/b][br /]
"I’ve never been there before – I never thought they would let me in."[br /]
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• [b]On his Dream[/b] [br /]
"Ideally, I would like to be a rock star, but that’s only a dream."[br /]
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• [b]On Wimbledon Umpires[/b][br /]
"I get screwed by the Umpires in this place."[br /]
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• [b]On Davis Cup[/b] [br /]
"My mother made me promise her I’d always play for my country if I was asked.[br /]
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• [b]On Not Attending the Traditional Wimbledon Winners Dinner in 1981[/b][br /]
"I wanted to spend (the night) with my family and friends and the people who had supported me, not a bunch of stiffs who were 70-80 years old, telling you that you are acting like a jerk."[br /]
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• [b]On his Induction into International Tennis Hall of Fame[/b][br /]
"I now have the best of both worlds, because I do the biggest events in London, Paris and New York. As far as my commercial stuff, I have fun with that too."[br /]
[br /]
• [b]On French Open[/b] [br /]
"The biggest disappointment of my career, if you had to pick one, would be the ’84 match… I really didn’t take the French Open very seriously. It wasn’t considered anywhere near the level of Wimbledon or the US Open."[br /]
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• [b]On American Chances at the French Open
[/b][br /]
"The surface they play on in Europe is different than what they play on here. There’s not as many facilities available ver here to prepare to play on that surface. And I don’t think that people realize, fans and media alike, the difference in the surfaces."[br /]
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• [b]On Playing on Clay[/b][br /]
"The only reason I like playing on clay now at this stage of my career is that it’s a bit easier on my body… I don’t think that clay court tennis should ever be equal of what it is indoors or on hard court surfaces."[br /]
[br /]
• [b]On Marcelo Rios[/b][br /]
"It’s misleading, but I still think he should be proud of the effort… He’s still got a lot of work to do if he wants to consider himself a No 1."[br /]
[br /]
• [b]On Martina Hingis [/b][br /]
"I think she’s come into a vacuum in women’s tennis… She came in at a time where she’s old beyond her years."[br /]
[br /]
• [b]On Teenage Stars of Women’s Game[/b][br /]
"They’re so young. It’s incredible how young they are. They’re like gymnasts now. They are peaking at such a young age… I don’t think its healthy for these 16, 17-year-old players to be at the top. That’s too young for a sport."[br /]
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• [b]On Why He continues to play On the Senior Circuit[/b][br /]
"It keeps me in a better condition than if I wasn’t playing… In a lot of ways it’s helped me."[br /]
[br /]
• [b]On His Goals for the Future[/b][br /]
"My goal is to turn into the George Foreman of tennis. He’s a great personality and he can fight… I’d like to enjoy my sport as much as he enjoys his."[br /]
[br /]
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• 17 Grand Slams[br /]
[br /]
• Wimbledon[br /]
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Singles –1981, 1983, 1984[br /]

Doubles – 1979, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1992[br /]

Singles finalist – 1980, 1982[br /]

Mixed doubles finalist – 1999[br /]
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• French Open[br /]
[br /]
Singles finalist – 1984[br /]

Mixed doubles - 1977[br /]
[br /]
• US Open[br /]
[br /]
Singles – 1979, 1980, 1981, 1984[br /]

Singles finalist – 1985[br /]

Doubles – 1979, 1981, 1983, 1989[br /]
[br /]
• Davis Cup[br /]
[br /]
Team Member – 1978 to 1984, 1987 to 1989, 1991, 1992[br /]
[br /]
• Ranked in the World Top 10 for 10 years[br /]
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• Ranked in the US Top 10 for 16 years[br /]
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• Ranked as No 1 US player for 7 years[br /]
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• Winner of 71 career singles titles[br /]
[br /]

• Winner of 77 career doubles titles[br /]
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• Career prize money – $12.5 million[br /]
[br /]
• Won 13 of the 15 tournaments he played in 1984.[br /]
[br /]
• Holds six Davis Cup records.[br /]
[br /]
• Voted Tennis magazine’s Rookie of the Year in 1977[br /]
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• Association of Tennis Professional (ATP) recognized him as the Newcomer of the Year in 1978.[br /]
[br /]
• Earned an Emmy nomination for Best Sports Analyst in 1998.[br /]
[br /]
• Inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame on Saturday, July 10, 1999.[br /]
[br /]
• Was immortalized by Madame Tussauds Museum.[br /]
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Comments - John McEnroe