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Detail of Biography - Martina Navratilova
Name :
Martina Navratilova
Date :
Views :
1615
Category :
Birth Date :
18/10/2056
Birth Place :
Prague, Czechoslovakia (now, the Czech Republic).
Death Date :
Not Available
Biography - Martina Navratilova
Not Available
[b]‘Play Like A Boy !’[/b][br /]
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A 12-year girl went to a shoe store with her father. Her appearance caused people to often mistake her for a boy. Once, an old woman called her, "Scout… Scout, could you help me cross the street ?"[br /]
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The young girl was very upset at the time. She looked at herself in a full-length mirror. Seeing her big ears, big jaws and big feet, she began to cry. When her father asked the reason, with tears in her eyes, she replied, "I’m always going to look like a boy."[br /]
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His father patted her shoulder and consoled her, saying she was ‘a late bloomer’ and when she would grow up, she would look pretty. He told her if she looked like a boy then she should play tennis like a boy: aggressively.[br /]
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He groomed the girl’s talent, encouraged her to attack first, to move to the net at her optimum possible level, and to create a spectacular style herself. It was her father’s training for many years that made her accustomed to daring and instinctive play. He prophesized : "One day you will become a Wimbledon champion." And his words rang true. The girl followed her father’s advice and realized her dream. The father’s name was Mirek Navratil. And the girl was Martina Navratilova.[br /]
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[b]DAUGHTER OF CZECHOSLOVAKIA[/b][br /]
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Martina Navratilova was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic), on October 18, 1956. Her name, unique in those days, was the feminine form of the mountain lodge where she was conceived.[br /]
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In Czechoslovakia, there is a tradition that girls take the suffix ‘ova’ after thier father’s family name; and after marriage, suffix the same after the husband’s name. Martina’s mother married twice. So for the first 10 years, Martina was called Martina Subertova.[br /]
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After her mother’s second marriage to Mirek Navratil, Martina changed her name to, as she is known today, Martina Navratilova.[br /]
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Five weeks after Martina’s birth, her mother Jana, returned to Martinovka with the newborn baby. Jana was a ski instructor, who gave Martina her first ski lessons at the age of two. Martina writes recalling the foggy memories of her childhood, "Can you really recall something that happened when you were two years old ? I feel I can remember whizzing down a hill for the first time, the hard-packed snow under my skis, the sun in my eyes, a big smile on my face. Or maybe I’ve looked at the pictures of me so many times that I only think I remember."[br /]
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Martina, a happy little child just out of nappies, enjoyed zipping down the slopes of the icy Krkonose mountains. Perhaps, then onwards, her love for the mountains began to blossom and it increased gradually with age. Perhaps this is the reason why she chose Aspen, Colorado, as her residence.[br /]
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[b]Mirek Navratil – A ‘Real’ Father[/b][br /]
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Martina was only three when her parents divorced. Her mother Jana moved to her mother’s place, Revnice. It was a small village in the Bohemian countryside, just outside the Prague. Her mother remarried Mirek Navratil in 1962. Martina was six at that time. Martina has a vague memory of her real father. Her real father would come around a couple of times a year and take Martina to the Prague Zoo and other places of entertainment. For some reason, he stopped coming after two years. Martina never missed him as she had a loving stepfather, Mirek. He would pamper Martina. It was Mirek, who taught Martina to hold a racquet and was her first tennis coach. Martina was lucky to have an affectionate father. Martina’s stepfather was also happy because little Martina was very enthusiastic and could keep pace with him. Mirek enjoyed teaching her tennis.[br /]
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Martina’s family was one of the thousands of families that suffered the consequences of Russian invasion into Czech and Slovak areas. The Czech economy continued to crumble because of this, and as a result, people often faced shortages and scarcities. His parents had denied joining the Communist party. Martina was brought up in an affectionate atmosphere, but her family also faced scarcities. Her father had a stable job in a factory and her mother did odd jobs. Despite their hard efforts, life was not comfortable though it was comparatively much better than others. They did not have a car or even a geyser. But, they had their own house, they could enjoy their vacation every year, and most important, the children did not need to do any physical work.[br /]
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In 1963, Martina got a new companion as her sister, also named Jana. The small happy family lived in their grandparents’ house in Revnice. It was not far from the municipal tennis club, where her mother worked.[br /]
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At the club, there were tennis courts made of crushed red clay, generally found everywhere in Europe. On these courts, people would enjoy their liesure hours playing a friendly and almost ceremonial game, which is called plunk-plunk-plunk. In springtime, after a snowfall, everyone had to work for maintenance of these courts. The Czech economy being poor, people who worked for two hours for maintenance of the tennis court would merely get a packet of American cigarettes. For three hours work, they would get a whole chicken! Little Martina helped her mother do this kind of job.[br /]
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Tennis was a family tradition in Martina’s household. Her grandmother Agnes Semanska had once defeated the 1962-Wimbledon finalist Vera Sukova’s mother. Prior to World War II, Agnes Semanska had earned her place as a good tennis player for the Czechoslovakian Federation, becoming part of the family legend. She was very energetic and worked until the age of 70. But unfortunately, Martina’s mother Jana, could not become as good a tennis player. The reason: Martina’s grandfather, Jan Semanska. He was, in Martina’s words, ‘a nasty little old man’, who pressurized Jana to play tennis. Her mother had a good athletic physique as well as abilities. Martina inherited athletic power from her mother and grandmother. But Martina’s mother disliked being tortured by her father, so she finally quit and never played competitive tennis.[br /]
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Martina inherited one of her champion grandmother’s old-fashioned wooden racquets. From the very beginning, she could wield the racquet skillfully with both hands. It was a spectacular scene to see a four-year girl practising for hours and hitting the ball against the cement wall. Though only a little child, her physique was only muscle and bone. On the clay court, her reflexes were always faster than other children her age.[br /]
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In childhood, Martina would go with her father to Brady Mountain to pick up mushrooms and berries. She would taste some fresh mushrooms and dry the rest of her collection and store them in the attic at home. She loved the aroma of drying mushrooms. Many a time she was frightened by stories of monsters and Noon Witch in the attic, but brave Martina always imagined fighting such ‘monsters’.[br /]
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On windy days, she would venture out with her father to the fields, to fly a paper dragon kite. In winter, amidst heavy snowfall, they would go to the Krkonose Mountains for skiing. They would swim in the lakes and rivers around the town in summer. But the whole Navratil family was passionate for one game: Tennis. They would play tennis in almost all seasons. Martina’s father believed in discipline. One day, as punishment for some wrongdoing, Martina was ordered not to ride her bike for the day. Martina became furious and broke a windowpane, kicking a soccer ball. She went to her father to inform him about her ‘revenge’. He simply answered, ‘Because you busted your window, you can ride the bike’ !
However, Mirek was everything to Martina – father, coach and guide. Recalling her father’s support, she writes in her autobiography; "I’m proud that Mirek Navratil’s family name is embossed on the trophies from Wimbledon and the other tournaments I have won. He was a father to me in every sense of the word, and it was his energy, his enthusiasm, that gave me my chance in tennis."[br /]
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Martina often felt sorry for her father when people called her Martina Subertova. She wanted to make her loving stepfather happy. So when she was 10, Martina changed her surname from Subertova to Navratilova.[br /]
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[b]Parma – An Alchemist[/b][br /]
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In school, Martina was good in the Czech language, literature, and mathematics. She got grades ranging from one to five. But she disliked painting classes. At school, while attending home economics classes, she would stare at the tennis courts and dream of becoming a tennis player. Her classmates often asked her, "Martina, what will you do with all this tennis ?"[br /]
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In fact, Martina too probed the same question but with the hope that some day she would surely find the answer.[br /]
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One night, her father took her to the Sparta sports center in Prague, where the Australian redhead, left-hander Rod Laver was the center of attraction. Martina became fascinated by his playing style, and determined to become a player like him. She wrote about her first image of Laver : "God, what power and agility he had, what drive ! I saw him rocketing around the court and I thought, that’s it, that’s me, that’s the player I want to be. Women didn’t play like him, not then, and not now, really, but if ever there was a player I wanted to copy, it was Laver."[br /]
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Only after seeing Laver on court, could Martina realize what world class tennis was. She began dreaming about winning the Federation Cup for Czechoslovakia. His father encouraged her to march ahead on the path towards realization of her dream.
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From the age of eight, Martina, a left-hander, had started collecting victories and experience playing junior tournaments at her hometown and at other places. When she turned nine, her father took her to Klamovka Park, where Martina was introduced to a coach.[br /]
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He asked, "How old is he ?"[br /]
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Perhaps Martina’s short hair and wiry build caused him to think that Martina was a boy ! Her father requested him to take her under his coaching, but the busy coach put a condition that he could give only a few hours for new players and couldn’t promise anything.[br /]
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But after testing her skill, he uttered, "I think we can do something with her."[br /]
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Martina was lucky to have the guidance of George Parma, the greatest Czechoslovakian tennis player then.[br /]
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Martina’s tough training began. Once a week, she would hurry from school to catch the train to Prague. We can imagine what it must have looked like: A girl rushing across the platform with a tennis racquet sticking out, a gym bag at another angle, and a school bag touching her ankles. "…I developed my strength and my speed running for trains when I was nine and ten years old", Martina said later on.[br /]
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Parma was the most patient coach. He never shouted at her nor disappointed her in any way. He would always say, "Come on, Martina." The first thing he did was change her backhand shots. He taught her to play near the net, more aggressively. He would compare her playing style with a cat – a tiger. But he would also clarify that sometimes even a tiger has to be conservative.[br /]
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[b]America – A Passage to Success[/b][br /]
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By 1972, just before Martina turned 16, she received more acclaim outside the country, competing in Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland and East Germany. In 1972, she went to play the Czech national championship at Ostrava, not far away from the Polish border. Martina, despite being sick and having an injured knee, fought against Vlasta Vopickovca with her full potential. The match resulted in Martina’s favor by 7-5, 6-4. She returned home becoming the national champion and the next day’s newspapers were all filled with the headlines appreciating Martina’s performance, and the media persons started addressing her as a ‘Promising Junior’.[br /]
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Next year, she went to England to play an indoor tournament at Torquay. Looking at Martina playing on a wooden surface in the hotel during the competition, the great BBC TV commentator, Dan Maskell, prophesized that she was a Wimbledon champion in the making.[br /]
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Meanwhile, the most dramatic scene in the history of Czechoslovakia took place. On the morning of August 21, 1968, Russian tanks entered Prague, suppressing the silent hope of change harbored by the Czech people after the 1948 battle against Soviet Union. The spring of Prague was seemingly nearing its end. Because of the 1968 Russian invasion of Czechoslovakia, players like Martina began to feel insecure. Money was scarce due to the foreign government which used the sports champions as mere propaganda tools. Martina, all for liberty, decided not to stay any longer under her present circumstances. With the determination to become a professional player, she flew to the US in the autumn of 1973.[br /]
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Martina stepped into the homeland of hamburgers and the realm of glittering Hollywood stars like Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, her favorite stars.[br /]
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Martina was not well-versed in the English language. Her first conversation with a Belgian player, Michelle Gourdal, went like this :[br /]
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Martina, "Did you play ?"[br /]
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Michelle, "Yes."[br /]
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The second question : "Did you win ?"[br /]
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The answer was : "No."[br /]
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Martina summed up the dialogue with, "Oh ! That’s too bad."[br /]
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Afterwards, she tried to improve her English and did it.[br /]
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Martina’s first match was played at Akron, Ohio, in 1973. It was the beginning of her 21-year long career, till 1994. The world witnessed the beginning of the most interesting rivalry in the history of tennis : Martina Navratilova v/s Christine Evert. Martina lost her first ever world-class match but was satisfied with her performance. Even Chris, the winner of the match, said later, "She was overweight but eager and gifted, … It was a close match (7-6, 6-3). Even though I’d never heard of her, and couldn’t pronounce or spell her name, I could tell she’d be a trouble. Especially if she got in shape." Martina’s 140 lbs. weight at 5' 7½" height troubled her but she was to create trouble for Chris in future. She attained peak fitness, shaping herself like a sturdy girl.[br /]
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Martina was back in Prague. For a few months, tennis was not part of her life. She began her full-time study in high school.[br /]


In her youth, she was attracted to an architecture student who also worked in some government position. Martina’s father would always advise her, "It’s a big part of marriage, but you shouldn’t go to bed with somebody unless you plan to marry him." For Martina, marriage was nowhere in her life. She developed a relationship with the guy. But she put a full stop to the relationship as she was traveling too much and he was busy in studies. Both agreed to stay friends and pursue their careers.[br /]
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In 1974, Martina returned to the US for the tour of California. Martina and her family always dreamt of a car, costing $2000. Martina’s father earned about $100 a month and her mother’s salary was even less. At that time, the Czechoslovakian Federation was not ready to accept professionalism in sport. Frustrated by continuous interference in her career, Martina began to think seriously about settling down in the US. She wanted to become a world-class tennis player. In her motherland, it seemed like a mirage. The Federation threatened her by not giving her a visa because of her frank views. Martina was treated like a little girl and was forced to finish high school. She found it ridiculous as a professional athlete, who was not given permission to play team tennis. Finally, she left her native for the last time to play the US Open.[br /]
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In the US Open, she was defeated in the semi-finals again, by Chris Evert.[br /]
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[b]Dream Come True[/b][br /]
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After a month, Martina got the ‘Green Card’ at the age of 19. Martina, far away from her family, developed new relationship. She had already finished the student life and was moving into a new phase. While traveling to the States, she realized that she felt more comfortable being with women than with men. She would practise tennis and spend her free hours playing ice hockey or soccer with friends, most of them girls.
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Martina was hoping to get the citizenship as early as possible, so she could meet her family in Czechoslovakia whenever she desired. But it was not so easy because of her inconsistent performance on the court. Often it happened that victory at the last moment would turn into a defeat. The other way to get the US citizenship faster was to marry an American. But Martina did not have anybody in mind. At the crucial stage of her career, she could not achieve the success that she had dreamt of. Moreover, she gained weight that inspired Bud Collins to nickname her The Great Wide Hope, which is famous till today.[br /]
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Martina, conscious of her career, began efforts to reduce weight, but not at the cost of her stamina. In April 1976, she got a good friend, who taught Martina to rationalize her tumultuous emotions, which affected her performance badly. She was Sandra Haynie, a professional golf player since 1961 and winner of the US Open and Ladies’ Professional Golf Association Championships in 1974. Martina was fascinated by her play. She taught Martina how to remove her inconsistency on court and also explained the importance of timing. The most important lesson she gave her was not getting disturbed on court. She gave a golden advice:[br /]
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"It’s fine if you want to get frustrated with yourself but turn it inwards, don’t turn it outward.[br /]
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You have to learn to direct your energy. Don’t yell at the officials. Get mad at yourself not at them."[br /]
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With Haynie’s encouragement, Martina’s game began to pick up, almost on the right track.[br /]
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[b]World Champion[/b][br /]
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Next, Martina stepped into court with a killer instinct. Setting the tennis world afire, she won her first Wimbledon title on July 8, 1978.[br /]
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At that time, she must have recalled her father’s words;[br /]
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"One day you will become a champion at Wimbledon."[br /]
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The prophecy came true. The most important was to defeat Chris Evert, the world’s top-ranked player, who had dominated the court for the last four years.[br /]
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Four days later, the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) declared Martina as the world’s No.1 player.[br /]
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In the coming years, Martina could shake off her loser-label. She won several Virginia Slims and other tournaments.[br /]
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The year 1978 brought major controversies for Martina; mostly because of her relationship with Rita Mae Brown, America’s bestseller author. Martina describes the months spent with her in her autobiography, "…formed one of those romantic times. We started traveling together – long dinners, and glasses of wine, suede and lace and silk instead of Gatorade and warm-up suits – and I got to know her better."[br /]
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Perhaps, this controversial issue influenced her game. She won the Wimbledon again in 1979, but lost the Grand Slam tournaments in 1980. During this period, her relationship with Rita Mae was much publicized by the press. Martina accepted her bisexuality publicly.[br /]
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[b]US Citizenship[/b][br /]
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Despite being shrouded in such controversies, she got her US citizenship on July 21, 1981. It took four years’ waiting before she could once again meet her parents and sister. Martina, was no longer a Czechoslovakian. She would now be recognized as an American, officially.[br /]
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That year, the ‘American Tennis Typhoon’ Martina astonished critics by winning the Australian Open.[br /]
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In the summer of 1981, she moved to Dallas to live with basketball star Nancy Liberman, a great basketball player and friend. It was opening of a new chapter in her career, which would add more successes, great records and cheers from spectators in her favor again. This was thanks to the rigorous training of Nancy Liberman. Martina’s collaboration with Nancy lasted for four years, from 1981 to 1984. She trained Martina until her body pained. Her guidance and tough training from lifting weights to stretching, from running sprints to agility exercises, and a particular diet, developed in Martina all the athletic factors essential for a tennis player.[br /]
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By the autumn of 1981, Martina reduced her weight from 167 lbs to 145 lbs A skin-fold caliper test was carried out in December. The result was amazing ! Martina’s total weight was only 8.8 per cent body fat, compared to the average 12 to 14 per cent of an average tennis player.[br /]
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[b]Millionaire Martina[/b][br /]
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By the time of the 1983 US Open, Martina was prepared to win it. For the first time, she hired Renée Richards and Mike Estep as full-time coaches. With their help Martina elaborated upon innovative training techniques, improved her strokes, serves and volleys. Gradually, wooden racquets were replaced by new light ones, which revolutionized the game.[br /]
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In 1982, showing the world her newfound power, both physical and mental, she won a record 15 singles tournaments. Besides, she won 14 double tournaments in the same year. In a total of 29 victories, she performed her best, regaining her no.1 position. Another achievement was, becoming the first female athlete to earn more than US $ 1 million in a year.[br /]
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In 1983, she won her first US Open. She also won 15 singles and 13 doubles tournaments in the same year and proved her mettle, winning again at Wimbledon and the Australian Open. She could not repeat the history of the 1982- French Open victory in 1983, as she lost the final to Kathy Horvarth. But retained her status as world’s no.1 from ’82 to ’87, for the most part of it.[br /]
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Meanwhile, a new person entered her life. She was Judy Nelson, who had had a television career during her college days and later operated some steak restaurants. She was a married, beautiful lady, and playing tennis was one of her hobbies. Martina and Judy were publicized as lesbians. The relationship lasted eight years and ended in 1991. Their separation after an unpleasant suit, retained the local media’s interest for months![br /]
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[b]Fighting Onwards…[/b][br /]
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It took Martina years to stop Chris Evert’s domination, but she did it. Martina and Chris’ friendly rivalry had created tremendous excitement in the public. They showed two different styles of interpreting tennis. On one side, were spectacular moves to the net with thrilling serve and volley, whereas, on the other hand, precise baseline attacks. Martina was a wave of emotion and Chris, an ocean of self-control. This 10-year battle attracted sports fans from all over the world to watch women’s tennis. In other words, tennis was revived.[br /]
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The spectacular tennis–decade ended in 1988, with Martina’s victory in the Virginia Slims tournament at Chicago. Chris disappeared from the court, retiring in 1989.[br /]
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A new challenge was ready to beat Martina in the form of Steffi Graf, a promising young German player. In August 1987, she had already captured the No. 1 title, when Martina was nearing 31. Steffi was too young. But Martina, inspired by Chris Evert, fought against young blood, and continued to achieve great victories. In 1987, she won her sixth consecutive Wimbledon title, breaking the record of Suzanne Lenglen.[br /]
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In 1990, she set an all-time record of nine Wimbledon titles, previously held by Helen Willis Moody. She was 33, and still raring to go. A decade later, Martina said: "I prefer to consider my love for Wimbledon a rational reverence."[br /]
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In 1992, Martina set another record, this time, a world record. On winning her 158th title, she had won the maximum number of titles than any other male or female player in the history of tennis.[br /]
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However, she never regained her No. 1 ranking. She played three straight finals - US Open, Milan and Virginia. Meanwhile, the No. 1 crown was captured by a 17-year-old powerful newcomer, Monica Seles. Martina at the age of 36 years and four months, faced Seles who was less than half her age ! The world was stunned on February 21, 1993, as ‘old’ Martina defeated the young and world’s top player Monica. The match resulted in Martina’s favor, after three sets and a final tie-breaker.[br /]
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By the year end, she announced her decision to leave professional tennis, the next year. When asked by reporters, she said, "I don’t know if I am going to be here tomorrow. You could walk down the street and get hit by a cab. I mean, I am not saying obviously, if you are 17, you have a much better chance of being back next year than when you are 35. The time is running out. I don’t know how much I have in this head and heart and legs. I don’t know. But you know, if I was 17 years old, I certainly wouldn’t think that this is my last Grand Slam. Don’t read into this that Martina is quitting. I can see the headlines again tomorrow…"[br /]
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The year 1994 was memorable. It was Martina’s farewell. She officially bid goodbye to all her fans and all the tournaments. In her last match at Rome, she gracefully accepted her defeat against Spanish girl Conchita Martinez.[br /]
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On her farewell, in the hall of Madison Square Garden she was presented a unique tennis ball, on which 10,000 signatures were made by fans from all over the world. And on one portion of the ball, four simple but memorable words were written:
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THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES[br /]
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A Czech-born American girl had entered into the tennis court with hope in her heart and dreams in her eyes, and left it quietly with a satisfaction of fulfilling her dreams. When she left, her bag was full of awards, titles and records.[br /]
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Today, she has been inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame. She is respected as the most charismatic figure, the ultimate champion and ambassador of her sport – tennis. She still competes in selected Sanex WTA Tour events, Women’s Sports Legend events and in World Team Tennis matches. She served as president of WTA (Women’s Tennis Association) Tour Players Association from 1989 to 1995. She has authored five books, including her autobiography. She has been working for environment, children’s and gays’ rights. Moreover, she has been an expert commentator for HBO during Wimbledon since 1995, the spokesperson for the Rainbow Card Foundation, working for the WTA Tour Players Development Program, and also a promoter of women and young players in tennis.
She supports a number of non-profit groups and charitable institutions.[br /]
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Even today, the queen of tennis recalls her days, "I remember the first time I played tennis on a real court… The moment I stepped onto that crunchy red clay, felt the grit under my sneakers, felt the joy of smacking a ball over the net, I knew I was in the right place. I was probably about six years old when that happened, …but I can remember it as if it was yesterday."[br /]
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[b]Martina Navratilova[/b], a Czech-American tennis player, who came to the United States with a racquet in hand and hope in heart, after two decades, left the court, becoming the Queen of Tennis. A stubborn, independent person, much publicized for being a lesbian, Martina revolutionized the game with her athleticism and aggressiveness. Finding her motherland, Czechoslovakia, a small place for making a world-class tennis career, she took a bold step to settle forever in a liberal country, America. By heart, the ‘born American’ player’s dynamic, attacking, serve-and-volley style revived tennis and gave a catalytic effect that created altogether a new class of tennis lovers. She holds the world record of 167 singles titles in tennis, which includes a record nine Wimbledon and total 18 Grand Slams. The record remains unsurpassed till today, by a male or a female. An outspoken and perhaps the most daring female athlete of the 20th century, she is still active in various social issues, including environmental issues and children’s, animals and gays’ rights.[br /]
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A sports critic, Frank Deford’s words truly evaluate the tennis legend :[br /]
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[i]How gratifying it must have been for her…[/i][br /]
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[i]To have achieved so much; triumphed so magnificently, yet always, to have been the other, the odd one, alone : lefthander in a right-handed universe, gay in a straight world; defector, immigrant; the (last?) gallant volleyer among all those duplicate baseline bystes…[/i][br /]
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[i]When she came into the game, she was the European among Americans; she leaves as the American among Europeans and the only grown up left in the tennis crib.[/i][br /]
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• October 18, 1956[br /]

Born in Prague, Czechoslovakia (now, the Czech Republic).[br /]
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• 1958[br /]

Took her first ski lessons from her mother Jana Subertova.[br /]
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• 1959[br /]

Her parents divorced.[br /]
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• 1962[br /]

Remarriage of her mother to Mirek Navratil. Mirek became the first tennis coach of Martina.[br /]
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• 1967[br /]

Beginning of her serious tennis training under coaching of George Parma, a former Davis Cup Player. Participated in her first ever tennis tournament.[br /]
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• 1972[br /]

Became the National Tennis Champion.[br /]
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• 1973[br /]

Won the Junior Girls Championship at Wimbledon. Turned into professional tennis player.[br /]
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• 1975[br /]

Moved to the United States. Won the French Open doubles championships with Chris Evert. Ranked into the top three in the world of women’s tennis.[br /]
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•1978[br /]

Won her first Wimbledon singles championship title, defeating Chris Evert. Recognized as the world’s top-ranked women’s tennis player.[br /]
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• 1981[br /]

Won her first Australian Open singles championship title. Admitted of being bisexual.Became US citizen and settled there.[br /]
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• 1982[br /]

Won her first French Open singles championship title.[br /]
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1983
Won her first US Open Singles championship title.[br /]
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• 1985[br /]

Publication of her autobiography, Being Myself.[br /]
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• 1987[br /]

Broke Suzanne Lenglen’s record of five consecutive Wimbledon titles (1919–23).Won the Triple Crown at US Open Tournament.[br /]
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• 1990[br /]

Marked a new record, winning her 9th Wimbledon title.[br /]
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• 1991 [br /]

Bitter year for Martina as Judy Nelson her eight years lesbian partner, separated.[br /]
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• February 16,1992[br /]

Broke Chris Evert’s record for career singles championships, winning her 158th professional tennis title, ‘The Virginia Slims’ of Chicago.[br /]
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• 1992[br /]

Became the first female athlete to earn more than one million dollars in a year.[br /]
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• 1993[br /]

Became the oldest player to beat the youngest top ranked player Monica Seles, in professional tennis.[br /]
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• 1994[br /]

Retired from professional tennis, winning 167 singles titles. Served as the President of the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) Tour Players Association for two years.[br /]
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• 2000[br /]

Returned to professional tennis. Inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame.[br /]
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Not Available
• I just try to concentrate on concentrating.[br /]
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• The moment of victory is too short to live for that and nothing else.[br /]
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• Whoever said, It’s not whether you win or lose that counts, probably lost.[br /]
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• Just go out there and do what you’ve got to do.[br /]
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• I think the key is for women not to set any limits.[br /]
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• I came to live in a country I love; some people label me a defector. I have loved men and women in my life; I’ve been labeled the bisexual defector. Want to know another secret ? I’m even ambidextrous. I don’t like labels. Just call me Martina.[br /]
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• I’ve been in the twilight of my career longer than most people have had careers.[br /]
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• The people who run Wimbledon didn’t like it when I complained about their prize money, but the truth is I’m not money hungry.[br /]
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• It’s funny, the way people always say women are the foxes, the ones who’ll stab you in the back. In tennis, the men are much worse. We women speak our minds, and we have our arguments, but there’s none of the backstabbing you see with the men, nothing like the way Connors and Lendl go at each other.[br /]
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• The women are good at getting along. We spend much more time together than the men, and I guess that’s part of it, but we also seem to have an instinct for nurturing within us. We want to get along with people. Smooth things over. Sure, we’re competitive, but we’re subtle about it.[br /]
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• People who are rich want to be richer, but what’s the difference ? You can’t take it with you. The toys get different, that’s all. The rich guys buy a football team; the poor guys buy a football. It’s all relative.[br /]
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• When I die, I don’t want a lot of money in the bank. I’ll be happy spending my money, but not on tanks or B-52’s. All that money wasted on warfare while millions of people starve to death. Something needs to be done here, and I can’t think of a better way to spend the rest of my life, while I educate myself a little better.[br /]
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• [b]Oldest player[/b] to have beaten the World Ranked No. 1 (Monica Seles)[br /]
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• First player to have been ranked through three different decades[br /]
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• First woman in the history of sport to earn more than [b]$1 million[/b] a year[br /]
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• [b]Triple Crown[/b] at the US Open in 1987[br /]
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• Highest Grand Slam titles : [b]56[/b] (second to Margaret Court : 62)[br /]
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• Highest WTA Tour Awards, as player of the year : [b]7[/b][br /]
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• Prize money earned during 21 years of career : [b]$20.3 million[/b][br /]
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• Highest weeks, as number one of the world ranking : [b]331[/b] weeks(second to Steffi Graf )[br /]
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• Highest ITF World Champions Awards : [b]6[/b][br /]
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• Sportswoman of the year WSF Awards : [b]3[/b][br /]
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• Female Athlete of the Decade for the [b]1980s[/b][br /]
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• [b]Honorary doctorate[/b] in public service[br /]
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• [b]WTA[/b] David Gray Award for Contributors to Tennis[br /]
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• [b]WSF[/b] Wilma Rudolph Courage Award[br /]
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• Named in the list of [b]‘Sports Century’s 20 Greatest Athletes’[/b] by ESPN[br /]
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• Enshrined in the [b]International Tennis Hall of Fame[/b][br /]
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Comments - Martina Navratilova