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Detail of Biography - Ralph Emerson
Name :
Ralph Emerson
Date :
Views :
512
Category :
Birth Date :
25/05/1803
Birth Place :
Boston
Death Date :
Not Available
Biography - Ralph Emerson
Not Available
[b]EMERSON'S LIFE[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]MAY 25, 1803[/b][br /]

Born in Boston to William Emerson and Ruth Haskins Emerson.[br /]
[br /]

[b]APRIL 26, 1807[/b][br /]

Death of brother John Clarke.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MAY 12, 1811[/b][br /]

Father, William Emerson, died.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1812-17[/b][br /]

Attended Boston Latin School.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1820[/b][br /]

Began keeping journals, which he continued throughout virtually all his life. The first series was called "Wide World", expressing his current thoughts on all topics.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]COLLEGE[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]1821-25[/b][br /]

Attended Harvard College, in a rather undistinguished manner. Also taught "school for young ladies".[br /]
[br /]


[b]1822[/b][br /]

Published first article, in The Christian Disciple.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1825[/b][br /]

Admitted to middle class of Harvard Divinity School.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1826[/b][br /]

Preached first sermon in Samuel Ripley's pulpit.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1827[/b][br /]

Went to South Carolina and St. Augustine, Florida seeking better health.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1827-29[/b][br /]

Served as "supply" preacher.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1828[/b][br /]

Engaged to Ellen Tucker, age 17.[br /]

Mental breakdown of brother Edward.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1829[/b][br /]

Ordained as junior minister of Second Church (Unitarian) in Boston.[br /]
[br /]



[b]SEPTEMBER 10, 1829[/b][br /]

Married Ellen Tucker.[br /]
[br /]


[b]FEBRUARY 8, 1831[/b][br /]

Ellen died of tuberculosis.[br /]
[br /]


[b]OCTOBER 28, 1832[/b][br /]

Preached "Last Supper" sermon, resigned from Second Church.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]FIRST FOREIGN TRIP[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]DECEMBER 25, 1832[/b][br /]

First trip to Italy, France, England and Scotland.[br /]

Formulated many of his self-reliance "Nature" ideas on trip.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1833[/b][br /]

Met Coleridge, Wordsworth, had inspiring meeting with Carlyle. Interest in science, found connections with spirituality and the unity of all.[br /]
[br /]


[b]OCTOBER 9, 1833[/b][br /]

Returned enthusiastic about his new embracement of Transcendentalism.[br /]
[br /]


[b]NOVEMBER 5 , 1833[/b][br /]

Gave first lecture "The Uses of Natural History" at the Masonic Temple, Boston.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1833[/b][br /]

Frederic Hedge published article on Coleridge in "The Christian Examiner", which provides the first American recognition of the claims of Transcendentalism.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]IN CONCORD[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]1834[/b][br /]

Settled in Concord. Boarded with Ezra Ripley, his step grandfather. "Nature" and next set of lectures written there.[br /]
[br /]


[b]OCTOBER 1, 1834[/b][br /]

Brother Edward died unexpectedly, aged 29. Edward once said, "The arrow of the angel had gone too deep."[br /]
[br /]


Aunt Mary came to live with them for a year.[br /]
[br /]


Coming together of influences encourage Emerson's conviction that what is beyond nature is revealed to us through nature, that the miraculous is revealed through the scientific and the natural, and that the inner life is revealed through the life of the senses.[br /]
[br /]


Bronson Alcott established Temple School in Boston, a "remarkable" experiment in Transcendental education.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JANUARY-MARCH, 1835[/b][br /]

Lectured on "Biography".[br /]

Met Bronson Alcott.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]SECOND MARRIAGE[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]SEPTEMBER 14, 1835[/b][br /]

Married Lydia (Lydian) Jackson.[br /]

Margaret Fuller gave her "Conversations" to "interested persons".[br /]
[br /]


[b]NOVEMBER-JANUARY, 1835 - 36[/b][br /]

Lecture Series on "English Literature".[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]TOWARDS 'NATURE'[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]MAY 9, 1836[/b][br /]

Brother Charles died.[br /]
[br /]


[b]SEPT 9, 1836[/b][br /]

"Nature" published.[br /]

Met Margaret Fuller.[br /]

Formed Transcendental Club.[br /]
[br /]


[b]OCTOBER 30, 1836[/b][br /]

Son Waldo was born.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1837[/b][br /]

RWE delivered "The American Scholar" address at Harvard to seniors, one of whom is Henry David Thoreau. Thoreau responded to a suggestion of Emerson's, began to keep a journal. Led to an extraordinary lifetime of journal keeping.[br /]

Wrote "The Concord Hymn" and delivered "The American Scholar," the Phi Beta Kappa Society oration at Harvard.[br /]
[br /]

[b]JULY 15, 1838[/b][br /]

Gave "Divinity School Address" at Harvard. Later the prominent Andrews Norton attacks Emerson's views as "the latest form of infidelity".[br /]

Delivered "Literary Ethics" lecture at Dartmouth.[br /]

Jones Very makes first visit to Concord.[br /]
[br /]

[b]FEBRUARY 24, 1839[/b][br /]

Daughter Ellen was born.[br /]
[br /]

[b]DECEMBER-FEBRUARY, 1840[/b][br /]

Lectured the series "The Present Age".[br /]

Elizabeth Peabody opened a bookshop that became the gathering place for Transcendentalist.[br /]

Jones Very published 'Essays and Poems'.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1840-44[/b][br /]

Wrote for The Dial with Margaret Fuller as editor.[br /]
[br /]

[br /][b]JULY 1, 1840[/b][br /]

First issue came out.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MARCH 20, 1841[/b][br /]

"Essays" (First Series) published.[br /]

Included "Self-Reliance", "The Over-Soul" among others.[br /]
[br /]


[b]APRIL 26, 1841[/b][br /]

Thoreau moved into Emerson home for two-year stay, became household handyman, and father figure when Emerson was on lecture tour.[br /]
[br /]

[b]NOVEMBER 22, 1841[/b][br /]

Daughter Edith was born.[br /]

Brook Farm, an experiment in communal living, established by George Ripley and colleagues. Emerson did not join.[br /]

Theodore Parker attacked historical Christianity in his sermon "A Discourse of the Transient and Permanent in Christianity".[br /]
[br /]

[b]JANUARY 27, 1842[/b][br /]

Son Waldo gave lectures in New York, met Henry James.[br /]
[br /]


[b]JULY, 1842[/b][br /]

Assumed editorship of The Dial.[br /]
[br /]


[b]SEPTEMBER, 1842[/b][br /]

Visited Shaker community with Nathaniel Hawthorne. [br /]

William Ellery Channing died.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1843[/b][br /]

Delivered lecture series "New England" in Baltimore, New York, Philadelphia, Newark.[br /]

Bronson Alcott and friends established Fruitlands.[br /]

Nathaniel Hawthorne revealed attitude toward Transcendentalism in his allegory "The Celestial Railroad".[br /]
[br /]


[b]OCTOBER 19, 1844[/b][br /]

Emerson's "Essays : Second Series" published.[br /]

Sells well.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]HOSTILE TO SLAVERY[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]JULY 10, 1844[/b][br /]

Son Edward was born. [br /]

Delivered address "Emancipation in the British West Indies", first public statement against slavery.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1845[/b][br /]

Close friend Margaret Fuller published Woman in the Nineteenth Century. [br /]

Henry David Thoreau moved into self-built cabin on Walden Pond (on Emerson's property) for 2 years and 2 months, in order to "live deliberately".[br /]
[br /]


[b]DECEMBER-JANUARY, 1845-46[/b][br /]

Lecture series "Representative Men".[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]SECOND FOREIGN TRIP[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]DECEMBER 25, 1846[/b][br /]

Poems published.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1847-48[/b][br /]

Second trip to England and France, British lecture tour. [br /]

Visited Carlyle, Martineau, Wordsworth.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1849[/b][br /]

"Nature; Addresses and Lectures published again.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1850[/b][br /]

"Representative Men" published.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MAY - JUNE, 1850[/b][br /]

First western (Cleveland & Cincinnati) lecture tour.[br /]
[br /]


[b]JULY 19, 1850[/b][br /]

Margaret Fuller Ossoli drowned at sea off Long Island, New York on her return from Italy.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MAY, 1851[/b][br /]

Spoke on the Fugitive Slave Law.[br /]

Melville published "Moby Dick".[br /]
[br /]


[b]MAY, 1852[/b][br /]

Speaks on the Fugitive Slave Law.[br /]

Edited memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli.[br /]
[br /]


[b]DECEMBER - JANUARY, 1853[/b][br /]

Western lecture tour.[br /]

Hawthorne published "The Blithedale Romance" based in part on Brook Farm.[br /]
[br /]


[b]NOVEMBER 16, 1853[/b][br /]

Mother, Ruth Haskins Emerson, died at 85, at Emerson's home.[br /]
[br /]


[b]APRIL, 1854 [/b][br /]

Lectured on poetry at Harvard Divinity School.[br /]
[br /]

[b]DECEMBER, 1854[/b][br /]

Met Walt Whitman in New York City.[br /]

"Walden" by Thoreau is published. He also published "Life Without Principle", a definition of his transcendental criticism of materialism.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1855[/b][br /]

Whitman published "Leaves of Grass", Emerson believed Whitman to be a true American genius yet suggested to Whitman that some overtly sexual passages be omitted. Whitman declined.[br /]

"English Traits" published.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MAY 27, 1859 [/b][br /]

Brother Bulkeley died.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1860[/b][br /]

"The Conduct of Life" published.[br /]
[br /]

[b]1861[/b][br /]

Mobbed at Tremont Temple by pro-slavery agitators.[br /]
[br /]


[b]FEBRUARY, 1862[/b][br /]

Met Abraham Lincoln.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MAY 6, 1862[/b][br /]

Henry David Thoreau died. Emerson gave funeral oration.[br /]
[br /]


[b]JANUARY, 1863[/b][br /]

Hails Lincoln's "Emancipation Proclamation" with "Boston Hymn".[br /]
[br /]


[b]OCTOBER 3, 1863[/b][br /]

Aunt Mary Moody Emerson died.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1865[/b][br /]

Daughter Edith married William Hathaway Forbes.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1866 [/b][br /]

Given honorary doctorate at Harvard College.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1867[/b][br /]

"May-Day and Other Pieces" published.[br /]

Elected Harvard "Overseer".[br /]
[br /]


[b]SEPTEMBER 13, 1868[/b][br /]

Brother William died.[br /]
[br /]


[b]MARCH, 1870[/b][br /]

"Society and Solitude" published.[br /]

Launched lecture series "The Natural History of the Intellect".[br /]

Emerson's memory noticeably begins to fail.[br /]
[br /]


[b]APRIL - MAY, 1871[/b][br /]

Trip to California, met with famed naturalist John Muir who was enchanted with RWE. [br /]

Gave second Harvard lecture series.[br /]
[br /]


[b]JULY 24, 1872[/b][br /]

Emerson's house (Bush) burned.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]THIRD TRIP TO EUROPE[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]OCTOBER-MAY, 1872-73[/b][br /]

Third trip to Europe, including England (farewell visit to Carlyle) and Egypt while the house was being repaired.[br /]

The town celebrated his return much to Emerson's surprise.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1874[/b][br /]

"Parnassus" published.[br /]

Son Edward married Annie Keyes.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1875[/b][br /]

"Letters and Social Aims" published.[br /]

Discontinued regular journal entries.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1876[/b][br /]

Lectured at University of Virginia.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]POETIC PHILOSOPHER DEPARTS[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]FEBRUARY, 1881[/b][br /]

Read paper at Massachusetts Historical Society on the death of Carlyle.[br /]
[br /]


[b]APRIL 27, 1882[/b][br /]

Emerson died in Concord, at age 78 and was buried in Sleepy Hollow.[br /]
[br /]


[b][b]1883-86[/b][/b][br /]

Emerson-Carlyle correspondence published.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1884[/b][br /]

"Lectures and Biographical Sketches" published.[br /]

"Miscellanies" published.[br /]
[br /]


[b]NOVEMBER 13, 1892[/b][br /]

Lidian Emerson died at age 90.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1893[/b][br /]

"Natural History of the Intellect" and "Other Papers" published.[br /]
[br /]


[b]1909-1910[/b][br /]

"Journals" edited by son Edward Emerson and Waldo Emerson Forbes, published in ten volumes.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]GREAT MEN AND NATURE[/b][br /]
[br /]

Emerson's Representative Men begins with : "Uses of Great Men is Natural to believe in Great Men. If the companions of our children should turn out to be heroes, and the circumstance is high and poetic; that is, their genius is paramount. In the legends of the Gautama, the first men ate the earth and found it deliciously sweet.
[br /]
[br /]

Something is wanting to science until it has been humanized. The table of logarithms is one thing, and its vital play in botany, music, optics and architecture, another.[br /]
[br /]


Great men are thus a collyrium to clear our eyes from egotism and enable us to see other people and their works. But there are vices and follies incident to whole populations and ages. Men resemble their contemporaries even more than their progenitors.[br /]
[br /]

But a new danger appears in the excess of influence of the great man. His attractions warp us from our place. We have become underlings and intellectual suicides. Ah ! yonder in the horizon of our help; - other great men, new qualities, counterweights and checks on each other. We cloy of the honey of each peculiar greatness. Every hero becomes a bore at last.[br /]
[br /]


For nature wishes every thing to remain itself; and whilst every individual strives to grow and exclude and to exclude and grow, to the extremities of the universe, and to impose the law of its being on every other creature. Nature steadily aims to protect each against every other.[br /]
[br /]


Nature never sends a great man into the planet without confiding the secret to another soul. One gracious fact emerges from these studies - that there is true ascension in our love. The reputations of the nineteenth century will one day be quoted to prove its barbarism. The genius of humanity is the real subject whose biography is written in our annals. The history of the universe is symptomatic and life is unique.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

• Beware when the great God lets loose a thinker on this planet. Then all things are at risk. It is as when a conflagration has broken out in a great city, and no man knows what is safe, or where it will end.[br /]
[br /]

• We but half express ourselves, and are ashamed of that divine idea which each of us represents.[br /]
[br /]

• It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, 'Always do what you are afraid to do.[br /]
[br /]

• The less a man thinks or knows about his virtues, the better we like him.[br /]
[br /]

• Is not marriage an open question, when it is alleged, from the beginning of the world, that such as are in the institution wish to get out, and such as are out wish to get in ?[br /]
[br /]

• Hitch your wagon to a star.[br /]
[br /]

• To laugh often and much, to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children, to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends, to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded ![br /]
[br /]

• Give all to Love; Obey thy heart; friends, kindred, days, estate, good-fame, plans, credit and the Muse, nothing refuse.[br /]
[br /]

• Tis a brave master; Let it have scope : Follow it utterly, Hope beyond hope: High and more high It dives into noon, with wing unspent, Untold intent; But it is a god, Knows its own path And the outlets of the sky.[br /]
[br /]

• It was never for the mean; It required courage stout. Souls above doubt, Valor unbending. It will reward, they shall return more than they were, and ever ascending...[br /]
[br /]

• By necessity, by proclivity, and by delight, we all quote. In fact, it is as difficult to appropriate the thoughts of others, as it is to invent.[br /]
[br /]

• Stay at home in your mind. Don't recite other people's opinions. I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.[br /]
[br /]

• Next to the originator of a good sentence is the first quoter of it. I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.[br /]
[br /]

• If the colleges were better, if they really had it, you would need to get the police at the gates to keep order in the inrushing multitude. See in college how we thwart the natural love of learning by leaving the natural method of teaching what each wishes to learn, and insisting that you shall learn what you have no taste or capacity for. The college, which should be a place of delightful labor, is made odious and unhealthy, and the young men are tempted to frivolous amusements to rally their jaded spirits. I would have the studies elective. Scholarship is to be created not by compulsion, but by awakening a pure interest in knowledge. The wise instructor accomplishes this by opening to his pupils precisely the attractions the study has for himself. The marking is a system for schools, not for the college; for boys, not for men; and it is an ungracious work to put on a professor.[br /]
[br /]

• The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.[br /]
[br /]

• The faith that stands on authority is not faith.[br /]
[br /]

• We are born believing. A man bears beliefs, as a tree bears apples.[br /]
[br /]

• If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads.[br /]
[br /]

• There is nothing capricious in nature and the implanting of a desire indicates that its gratification is in the constitution of the creature that feel it.[br /]
[br /]

• We are students of words; we are shut up in schools, and colleges, and recitation rooms, for ten or fifteen years, and come out at last with a bag of wind, a memory of words, and do not know a thing.[br /]
[br /]

• You must pay for conformity. All goes well as long as you run with conformists. But you, who are honest men in other particulars, know that there is alive somewhere a man whose honesty reaches to this point also, that he shall not kneel to false gods, and, on the day when you meet him, you sink into the class of counterfeits.[br /]
[br /]

• A man of genius is privileged only as far as he is genius. His dullness is as insupportable as any other dullness.[br /]
[br /]

• The peril of every fine faculty is the delight of playing with it for pride. Talent is commonly developed at the expense of character, and the greater it grows, the more is the mischief. Talent is mistaken for genius, a dogma or system for truth, ambition for greatest, ingenuity for poetry, sensuality for art.[br /]
[br /]

• Those who cannot tell what they desire or expect still sigh and struggle with indefinite thoughts and vast wishes.[br /]
[br /]

• The measure of a master is his success in bringing all men around to his opinion twenty years later.[br /]
[br /]

• Beware when the great God lets loose a thinker on this planet. Then all things are at risk. It is as when a conflagration has broken out in a great city, and no man knows what is safe, or where it will end.[br /]
[br /]

• We but half express ourselves, and are ashamed of that divine idea which each of us represents.[br /]
[br /]

• It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, 'Always do what you are afraid to do.[br /]
[br /]

• The less a man thinks or knows about his virtues, the better we like him.[br /]
[br /]

• Is not marriage an open question, when it is alleged, from the beginning of the world, that such as are in the institution wish to get out, and such as are out wish to get in ?[br /]
[br /]

• We are prisoners of ideas.[br /]
[br /]

• The life of man is the true romance, which when it is valiantly conduced, will yield the imagination a higher joy than any fiction.[br /]
[br /]

• Sooner or later that which is now life shall be poetry, and every fair and manly trait shall add a richer strain to the song.[br /]
[br /]

• The power of love, as the basis of a State, has never been tried.[br /]
[br /]

• Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of our own mind.[br /]
[br /]

• The imbecility of men is always inviting the impudence of power.[br /]
[br /]

• Finish each day before you begin the next, and interpose a solid wall of sleep between the two. This you cannot do without temperance.[br /]
[br /]

• All our progress is an unfolding, like a vegetable bud. You have first an instinct, then an opinion, then a knowledge as the plant has root, bud, and fruit. Trust the instinct to the end. Though you can render no reason.[br /]
[br /]

• Proverbs are the literature of reason, or the statements of absolute truth, without qualification. Like the sacred books of each nation, they are the sanctuary of its intuitions.[br /]
[br /]

• The adventitious beauty of poetry may be felt in the greater delight with a verse given in a happy quotation than in the poem.[br /]
[br /]

• Science does not know its debt to imagination. Goethe did not believe that a great naturalist could exist without this faculty.[br /]
[br /]

• It is very easy in the world to live by the opinion of the world. It is very easy in solitude to be self-centered. But the finished man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude. I knew a man of simple habits and earnest character who never put out his hands nor opened his lips to court the public, and having survived several rotten reputations of younger men, honor came at last and sat down with him upon his private bench from which he had never stirred.[br /]
[br /]

• Whatever games are played with us, we must play no games with ourselves.[br /]
[br /]

• The greatest homage we can pay truth is to use it.[br /]
[br /]

• Without a rich heart, wealth is an ugly beggar.[br /]
[br /]

• He is great who confers the most benefits.[br /]
[br /]

• Often a certain abdication of prudence and foresight is an element of success.[br /]
[br /]

• There is no thought in any mind, but it quickly tends to convert itself into a power.[br /]
[br /]

• People wish to be settled. It is only as far as they are unsettled that there is any hope for them.[br /]
[br /]

• Self-trust is the essence of heroism.[br /]
[br /]

• Universities are of course hostile to geniuses, which, seeing and using ways of their own, discredit the routine: as churches and monasteries persecute youthful saints.[br /]
[br /]

• We are always getting ready to live but never living.[br /]
[br /]

• To share often and much; to leave the world a little better; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. That is to have succeeded.[br /]
[br /]

• This time, like all time, is a very good one if we but know what to do with it.[br /]
[br /]

• Our chief want in life is somebody who shall make us do what we can.[br /]
[br /]

• Art is a jealous mistress, and if a man has a genius for painting, poetry, music, architecture or philosophy, he makes a bad husband and an ill provider.[br /]
[br /]

• Foolish legislation is a rope of sand, which perishes in the twisting.[br /]
[br /]

• To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men-that is genius.[br /]
[br /]

• All mankind love a lover.[br /]
[br /]

• To the dull mind all nature is leaden. To the Illumined mind the whole world burns and sparkle with lights.[br /]
[br /]

• The best effect of fine persons is felt after we have left their presence.[br /]
[br /]

• The ancestor of every action is a thought.[br /]
[br /]

• Be and not seem.[br /]
[br /]

• A man is related to all nature.[br /]
[br /]

• Every man has his own vocation, talent is the call.[br /]
[br /]

• To be great is to be misunderstood.[br /]
[br /]

• A man is a god in ruins.[br /]
[br /]

• Life is a festival only to the wise.[br /]
[br /]

• Knowledge is the only elegance.[br /]
[br /]

• We boil at different degrees.[br /]
[br /]

• Infancy conforms to nobody; all conform to it.[br /]
[br /]

• We learn geology the morning after the earthquake.[br /]
[br /]

• What is the hardest thing in the world ? To think.[br /]
[br /]

• Accept your genius and say what you think.[br /]
[br /]

• Make yourself necessary to somebody.[br /]
[br /]

• Insist on yourself; never imitate.[br /]
[br /]

• Music causes us to think eloquently.[br /]
[br /]

• It is not length of life, but depth of life.[br /]
[br /]

• Go to the house of thy friend, for weeds choke the unused path.[br /]
[br /]

• We become what we think about all day long.[br /]
[br /]

• There is no knowledge that is not power.[br /]
[br /]

• The one thing in the world, of value, is the active soul.[br /]
[br /]

• A great part of courage is the courage of having done the thing before.[br /]
[br /]

• Heroism feels and never reasons and is therefore always right.[br /]
[br /]

• A good indignation brings out all one's powers.[br /]
[br /]

• Life is a perpetual instruction in cause and effect.[br /]
[br /]

• Make the most of yourself, for that is all there is of you.[br /]
[br /]

• Beauty rests on necessities. The line of beauty is the line of perfect economy.[br /]
[br /]

• People seem not to see that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.[br /]
[br /]

• Thought is the blossom; language the bud; action the fruit behind.[br /]
[br /]

• We walk alone in the world. Friends, such as we desire, are dreams and fables.[br /]
[br /]

• All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.[br /]
[br /]

• Judge of your natural character by what you do in dreams.[br /]
[br /]

• What your heart thinks is great, is great. The soul's emphasis is always right.[br /]
[br /]

• Every man alone is sincere. At the entrance of a second person, hypocrisy begins.[br /]
[br /]

• He is great who is what he is from nature, and who never reminds us of others.[br /]
[br /]

• A man must consider what a rich realm he abdicates when he becomes a conformist.[br /]
[br /]

• Let us treat men and women well; treat them as if they were real. Perhaps they are.[br /]
[br /]

• Our faith comes in moments ... yet there is a depth in those brief moments which constrains us to ascribe more reality to them than to all other experiences.[br /]
[br /]

• We boast our emancipation from many superstitions; but if we have broken any idols, it is merely through a transfer of idolatry.[br /]
[br /]

• What lies beyond us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.[br /]
[br /]

• Great men are they who see that spiritual is stronger than any material force, that thoughts rule the world.[br /]
[br /]

• Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events.[br /]
[br /]

• When I was praised I lost my time, for instantly I turned around to look at the work I had thought slightly of, and that day I made nothing new.[br /]
[br /]

• To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.[br /]
[br /]

• It is one of the most beautiful compensations of this life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself.[br /]
[br /]

• We cannot see things that stare us in the face until the hour comes that the mind is ripened.[br /]
[br /]

• Nothing can bring you peace but yourself. Nothing can bring you peace but the triumph of principles.[br /]
[br /]

• Be true to your own act and congratulate yourself if you have done something strange and extravagant to break the monotony of a decorous age.[br /]
[br /]

• Why should we be cowed by the name of Action ?...The rich mind lies in the sun and sleeps, and is Nature. To think is to act.[br /]
[br /]

• We are taught by great actions that the universe is the property of every individual in it.[br /]
[br /]

• It is a lesson which all history teaches wise men, to put trust in ideas, and not in circumstances.[br /]
[br /]

• If the single man plant himself indomitably on his instincts, and there abide, the huge world will come round to him.[br /]
[br /]

• He then learns that in going down into the secrets of his own mind he has descended into the secrets of all minds.[br /]
[br /]

• There is no beautifier of complexion or form of behaviour like the wish to scatter joy, and not pain, around us.[br /]
[br /]

• This gives force to the strong that the multitude have no habit of self-reliance or original action.[br /]
[br /]

• The virtue in most request is conformity. Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.[br /]
[br /]

• Act, if you like, but you do it at your peril. Men's actions are too strong for them. Show me a man who has acted and who has not been the victim and slave of his action.[br /]
[br /]

• Trust thyself : every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events.[br /]
[br /]

• Is the acorn better than the oak which is its fullness and completion ? Is the parent better than the child into whom he has cast his ripened being ? Whence, then, this worship of the past ?[br /]
[br /]

• "Let man serve law for man;[br /]

Live for friendship, live for love,[br /]

For truth's and harmony's be hoof;[br /]

The state may follow how it can,[br /]

As Olympus follows Jove."[br /]

"So neigh is grandeur to our dust,[br /]

So near to God is man[br /]

When duty whispers low, `Thou must'[br /]
,
The youth replies, `I can'."[br /]
[br /]

• Whatever you do, you need courage. Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising that tempt you to believe your critics are right. To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires some of the same courage that a soldier needs. Peace has its victories, but it takes brave men and women to win them.[br /]
[br /]

• A low self-love in the parent desires that his child should repeat his character and fortune. I suffer • whenever I see that common sight of a parent or senior imposing his opinion and way of thinking and being on a young soul to which he is totally unfit. Cannot we let people be themselves and enjoy life in their own way ? You are trying to make another you. One's enough.[br /]
[br /]

• No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature. Good and bad are but names very readily transferable to that or this; the only right is what is after my own constitution; the only wrong what is against it.[br /]
[br /]

• Nothing is more disgusting than the crowing about liberty by slaves, as most men are, and the flippant mistaking for freedom of some paper preamble like a Declaration of Independence, or the statute right to vote, by those who have never dared to think or to act.[br /]
[br /]

• A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do. He may as well concern himself with his shadow on the wall. Speak what you think now in hard words and tomorrow speaks what tomorrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradicts every thing you said today. 'Ah, so you shall be sure to be misunderstood.' Is it so bad then to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh.[br /]
[br /]

• I hate quotations.[br /]
[br /]

• There is properly no history, only biography.[br /]
[br /]

• There is creative reading as well as creative writing.[br /]
[br /]

• Criticism should not be querulous and wasting, all knife and root-puller, but guiding, instructive, inspiring.[br /]
[br /]

• The true poem is the poet's mind.[br /]
[br /]

• Poetry must be as new as foam and as old as the rock.[br /]
[br /]

• It does not need that a poem should be long. Every word was once a poem.[br /]
[br /]

• Every word was once a poem. Every new relationship is a new word.[br /]
[br /]

• Tis the good reader that makes the good book; in every book he finds passages which seem confidences or asides hidden from all else and unmistakably meant for his ear; the profit of books is according to the sensibility of the reader; the profoundest thought or passion sleeps as in a mine, until it is discovered by an equal mind and heart.[br /]
[br /]

• Men grind and grind in the mill of truism, and nothing comes out but what was put in. But the moment they desert the tradition for a spontaneous thought, then poetry, wit, hope, virtue, learning, anecdote, all flower to them all.[br /]
[br /]

• New arts destroy the old.[br /]
[br /]

• Life too near paralyses art.[br /]
[br /]

• Every artist was first an amateur.[br /]
[br /]

• Art is the path of the creator to his work.[br /]
[br /]

• Classic art was the art of necessity : modern romantic art bears the stamp of caprice and chance.[br /]
[br /]

• The arts and inventions of each period are only its costume, and do not invigorate men.[br /]
[br /]

• Painting was called silent poetry and poetry speaking painting. The laws of each are convertible into the laws of any other.[br /]
[br /]

• Art is a jealous mistress; and if a man have a genius for painting, poetry, music, architecture or philosophy, he makes a bad husband and an ill provider.[br /]
[br /]

• There is no way to success in art but to take off your coat, grind paint, and work like a digger on the railroad, all day and everyday.[br /]
[br /]

• The torpid artist seeks inspiration at any cost, by virtue or by vice, by friend or fiend, by prayer or by wine.[br /]
[br /]

• Artists must be sacrificed to their art. Like bees, they must put their lives into the sting they give.[br /]
[br /]

• The True Artist has the planet for his pedestal; the adventurer, after years of strife, has nothing broader than his shoes.[br /]
[br /]

• Big jobs usually go to the men who prove their ability to outgrow small ones.[br /]
[br /]

• People with great gifts are easy to find, but symmetrical and balanced ones never.[br /]
[br /]

• A man's action is only a picture book of his creed.[br /]
[br /]

• Men's actions are too strong for them. Show me a man who has acted, and who has not been the victim and slave of his action.[br /]
[br /]

• There is a tendency for things to right themselves.[br /]
[br /]

• We do not count a man's years until he has nothing else to count.[br /]
[br /]

• Without ambition one starts nothing. Without work one finishes nothing. The prize will not be sent to you. You have to win it. The man who knows how will always have a job. The man who also knows why will always be his boss. As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.[br /]
[br /]

• The intellectual man requires a fine bait; the sots are easily amused. But everybody is drugged with his own frenzy, and the pageant marches at all hours, with music and banner and badge.[br /]
[br /]

• Tis very certain that each man carries in his eye the exact indication of his rank in the immense scale of men, and we are always learning to read it. A complete man should need no auxiliaries to his personal presence.[br /]
[br /]

• Classic art was the art of necessity: modern romantic art bears the stamp of caprice and chance.[br /]
[br /]

• Perpetual modernness is the measure of merit in every work of art.[br /]
[br /]

• Sculpture and painting have the effect of teaching us manners and abolishing hurry.[br /]
[br /]

• To different minds, the same world is a hell, and a heaven.[br /]
[br /]

• As soon as beauty is sought not from religion and love, but for pleasure, it degrades the seeker.[br /]
[br /]

• We ascribe beauty to that which is simple; which has no superfluous parts; which exactly answers its end; which stands related to all things; which is the mean of many extremes.[br /]
[br /]

• Belief consists in accepting the affirmations of the soul; unbelief, in denying them. Our high respect for a well read person is praise enough for literature.[br /]
[br /]

• There is creative reading as well as creative writing.[br /]
[br /]

• There is also this benefit in brag, that the speaker is unconsciously expressing his own ideal. Humor him by all means, draw it all out, and hold him to it.[br /]
[br /]

• No change of circumstances can repair a defect of character.[br /]
[br /]

• Give no bounties: make equal laws : secure life and prosperity and you need not give alms.[br /]
[br /]

• We are as much informed of a writer's genius by what he selects as by what he originates.[br /]
[br /]

• All great masters are chiefly distinguished by the power of adding a second, a third, and perhaps a fourth step in a continuous line. Many a man had taken the first step. With every additional step you enhance immensely the value of your first.[br /]
[br /]

• For everything you have missed, you have gained something else; and for everything you gain, you lose something else.[br /]
[br /]

• We are the prisoners of ideas.[br /]
[br /]

• Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.[br /]
[br /]

• Conversation is an art in which a man has all mankind for competitors.[br /]
[br /]

• Courtesy Life be not so short but that there is always time for courtesy.[br /]
[br /]

• Criticism should not be querulous and wasting, all knife and root-puller, but guiding, instructive, inspiring.[br /]
[br /]

• As soon as there is life there is danger.[br /]
[br /]

• Once you make a decision, the universe conspires to make it happen.[br /]
[br /]

• Fate, then, is a name for facts not yet passed under the fire of thought; for causes which are un-penetrated.[br /]
[br /]

• There are always difficulties arising that tempt you to believe your critics are right. Self-command is the main discipline.[br /]
[br /]

• As men's prayers are a disease of the will, so are their creeds a disease of the intellect.[br /]
[br /]

• There are always difficulties arising that tempt you to believe your critics are right. Self-command is the main discipline.[br /]
[br /]

• I have heard with admiring submission the experience of the lady who declared that the sense of being perfectly well dressed gives a feeling of inward tranquility which religion is powerless to bestow.[br /]
[br /]

• I pay the schoolmaster, but it is the school boys who educate my son.[br /]
[br /]

• The secret in education lies in respecting the student.[br /]
[br /]

• Coal is a portable climate. It carries the heat of the tropics to Labrador and the polar circle; and it is the means of transporting itself whithersoever it is wanted. Watt and Stephenson whispered in the ear of mankind their secret, that a half-ounce of coal will draw two tons a mile, and coal carries coal, by rail and by boat, to make Canada as warm as Calcutta, and with its comfort brings its industrial power.[br /]
[br /]

• Enthusiasm is the leaping lightning, not to be measured by the horse-power of the understanding.[br /]
[br /]

• There is no one who does not exaggerate ![br /]
[br /]

• Intellectual tasting of life will not supersede muscular activity.[br /]
[br /]

• I hate the giving of the hand unless the whole man accompanies it.[br /]
[br /]

• Every fact is related on one side to sensation, and, on the other, to morals. The game of thought is, on the appearance of one of these two sides, to find the other; given the upper, to find the under side.[br /]
[br /]

• Our faith comes in moments... yet there is a depth in those brief moments which constrains us to ascribe more reality to them than to all other experiences.[br /]
[br /]

• Fame is proof that the people are gullible.[br /]
[br /]

• Fate is nothing but the deeds committed in a prior state of existence.[br /]
[br /]

• Fear defeats more people than any other one thing in the world.[br /]
[br /]

• For what avail the plough or sail, or land or life, if freedom fail ?[br /]
[br /]

• A friend may well be reckoned the masterpiece of nature.[br /]
[br /]

• I do then with my friends as I do with my books. I would have them where I can find them, but I seldom use them.[br /]
[br /]

• It is one of the blessings of old friends that you can afford to be stupid with them. Accept your genius and say what you think.[br /]
[br /]

• The greatest genius is the most indebted person.[br /]
[br /]

• We aim above the mark to hit the mark.[br /]
[br /]

• The meaning of good and bad, of better and worse, is simply helping or hurting. No great man ever complains of want of opportunity.[br /]
[br /]

• Not he is great who can alter matter, but he who can alter my state of mind.[br /]
[br /]

• The search after the great men is the dream of youth, and the most serious occupation of manhood.[br /]
[br /]

• To fill the hour that is happiness.[br /]
[br /]

• Great hearts steadily send forth the secret forces that incessantly draw great events. Every hero becomes a bore at last.[br /]
[br /]

• Be true to your own act and congratulate yourself if you have done something strange and extravagant to break the monotony of a decorous age.[br /]
[br /]

• At the entrance of a second person, hypocrisy begins.[br /]
[br /]

• Ideas must work through the brains and the arms of good and brave men, or they are no better than dreams.[br /]
[br /]

• We live by our imagination, our admirations, and our sentiments.[br /]
[br /]

• Imitation is suicide.[br /]
[br /]

• A man must consider what a rich realm he abdicates when he becomes a conformist.[br /]
[br /]

• Of course, money will do after its kind, and will steadily work to un-spiritualize and unchurch the people to whom it was bequeathed.[br /]
[br /]

• One definition of man is an intelligence served by organs.[br /]
[br /]

• If the single man plant himself indomitably on his instincts, and there abide, the huge world will come round to him.[br /]
[br /]

• I would have the studies elective. Scholarship is to be created not by compulsion, but by awakening a pure interest in knowledge. The wise instructor accomplishes this by opening to his pupils precisely the attractions the study has for himself. The marking is a system for schools, not for the college; for boys, not for men; and it is an ungracious work to put on a professor.[br /]
[br /]

• Language is a city to the building of which every human being brought a stone.[br /]
[br /]

• We are reformers in the spring and summer, but in autumn we stand by the old. Reformers in the morning, and conservers at night.[br /]
[br /]

• No man ever prayed heartily without learning something.[br /]
[br /]

• The years teach us much the days never knew.[br /]
[br /]

• Every violation of truth is not only a sort of suicide in the liar, but is a stab at the health of human society.[br /]
[br /]

• Like bees, they must put their lives into the sting they give.[br /]
[br /]

• Nothing is beneath you if it is in the direction of your life.[br /]
[br /]

• People do not deserve to have good writings; they are so pleased with the bad.[br /]
[br /]

• All mankind loves a lover.[br /]
[br /]

• Manners are the happy way of doing things; each once a stroke of genius or of love now repeated and hardened into usage. They form at last a rich varnish, with which the routine of life is washed, and its details adorned. If they are superficial, so are the dewdrops which give such depth to the morning meadows.[br /]
[br /]

• The martyr cannot be dishonored. Every lash inflicted is a tongue of fame; every prison a more illustrious abode.[br /]
[br /]

• Men cease to interest us when we find their limitations.[br /]
[br /]

• We boast our emancipation from many superstitions; but if we have broken any idols, it is through a transfer of idolatry.[br /]
[br /]

• It requires a great deal of boldness and a great deal of caution to make a great fortune, and when you have it, it requires ten times as much skill to keep it.[br /]
[br /]

• If you would lift me up you must be on higher ground.[br /]
[br /]

• Everything in Nature contains all the powers of Nature. Everything is made of hidden stuff.[br /]
[br /]

• Nature is an endless combination and repetition of a very few laws. She hums the old well-known air through innumerable variations.[br /]
[br /]

• Nature... She pardons no mistakes. Her yea is yea, and her nay, nay.[br /]
[br /]

• Necessity does everything well.[br /]
[br /]

• As long as a man stands in his own way, everything seems to be in his way.[br /]
[br /]

• Never lose an opportunity of seeing anything that is beautiful; for beauty is God's handwriting a wayside sacrament. Welcome it in every fair face, in every fair sky, in every fair flower, and thank God for it as a cup of blessing.[br /]
[br /]

• Is the parent better than the child into whom he has cast his ripened being ? Whence, then, this worship of the past ?[br /]
[br /]

• It is hard to go beyond your public. If they are satisfied with cheap performance, you will not easily arrive at better. If they know what is good, and require it, you will aspire and burn until you achieve it. But from time to time, in history, men are born a whole age too soon.[br /]
[br /]

• The worst of charity is that the lives you are asked to preserve are not worth preserving.[br /]
[br /]

• Few people have any next, they live from hand to mouth without a plan, and are always at the end of their line.[br /]
[br /]

• It does not need that a poem should be long. Every word was once a poem. Every new relationship is a new word.[br /]
[br /]

• Oh man! There is no planet sun or star could hold you, if you but knew what you are.[br /]
[br /]

• Nature arms each man with some faculty which enables him to do easily some feat impossible to any other.[br /]
[br /]

• The stupidity of men always invites the insolence of power.[br /]
[br /]

• When I was praised I lost my time, for instantly I turned around to look at the work I had thought slightly of, and that day I made nothing new.[br /]
[br /]

• Property is an intellectual production. The game requires coolness, right reasoning, promptness, and patience in the players.[br /]
[br /]

• Men achieve a certain greatness unawares, when working to another aim.[br /]
[br /]

• Every reform was once a private opinion, and when it shall be a private opinion again, it will solve the problem of the age.[br /]
[br /]

• The never-ending task of self improvement.[br /]
[br /]

• No one can cheat you out of ultimate success but yourself.[br /]
[br /]

• Self-trust is the first secret to success.[br /]
[br /]

• Let us be silent that we may hear the whispers of the gods.[br /]
[br /]

• Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members. The virtue in most request is conformity. Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.[br /]
[br /]

• Conversation enriches the understanding; but solitude is the school of genius.[br /]
[br /]

• The only thing grief has taught me is to know how shallow it is.[br /]
[br /]

• The soul's emphasis is always right.[br /]
[br /]

• The foundations of a person are not in matter but in spirit.[br /]
[br /]

• We acquire the strength we have overcome.[br /]
[br /]

• Talent is commonly developed at the expense of character.[br /]
[br /]

• The man who can make hard things easy is the educator.[br /]
[br /]

• A man's what he thinks about all day long.[br /]
[br /]

• The key to every man is his thought. Sturdy and defying though he look, he has a helm which he obeys, which is the idea after which all his facts are classified. He can only be reformed by showing him a new idea which commands his own. Thought makes every thing fit for use.[br /]
[br /]

• What your heart thinks is great, is great. The soul's emphasis is always right.
The surest poison is time.[br /]
[br /]

• No man should travel until he has learned the language of the country he visits. Otherwise he voluntarily makes himself a great baby so helpless and so ridiculous.[br /]
[br /]

• Trust men and they will be true to you; treat them greatly and they will show themselves great.[br /]
[br /]

• Trust thyself : every heart vibrates to that iron string.[br /]
[br /]

• The secret of ugliness consists not in irregularity, but in being uninteresting.[br /]
[br /]

• There is always safety in valor.[br /]
[br /]

• Men talk as if victory were something fortunate. Work is victory.[br /]
[br /]

• The virtues of society are vices of the saint. The terror of reform is the discovery that we must cast away our virtues, or what we have always esteemed such, into the same pit that has consumed our grosser vices.[br /]
[br /]

• A man's style is his mind's voice. Wooden minds, wooden voices.[br /]
[br /]

• Wealth is in applications of mind to nature; and the art of getting rich consists not in industry, much less in saving, but in a better order, in timeliness, in being at the right spot.[br /]
[br /]

• Raphael paints wisdom; Handel sings it, Phidias carves it, Shakespeare writes it, Wren builds it, Columbus sails it, Luther preaches it, Washington arms it, Watt mechanizes it. Wisdom is like electricity. There is no permanently wise man, but men capable of wisdom, who, being put into certain company, or other favorable conditions, become wise for a short time, as glasses rubbed acquire electric power for a while.[br /]
[br /]

• A man's wife has more power over him than the state has.[br /]
[br /]

• The sky is the daily bread of the eyes.[br /]
[br /]

• Poetry must be as new as foam, and as old as the rock.[br /]
[br /]

• Blessed are those who have no talent ![br /]
[br /]

• The word liberty in the mouth of Mr. Webster sounds likes the word love in the mouth of a courtesan.[br /]
[br /]

• I trust a good deal to common fame, as we all must. If a man has good corn, or wood, or boards, or pigs, to sell, or can make better chairs or knives, crucibles or church organs, than anybody else, you will find a broad hard-beaten road to his house, though it be in the woods.[br /]
[br /]

• The blazing evidence of immortality is our dissatisfaction with any other solution.[br /]
[br /]

• The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. Why should not we also enjoy an original relation to the universe ?[br /]
[br /]

• Undoubtedly we have no questions to ask which are unanswerable. We must trust the perfection of the creation so far, as to believe that whatever curiosity the order of things has awakened in our minds, the order of things can satisfy.[br /]
[br /]

• Crossing a bare common, in snow puddles, at twilight, under a clouded sky, without having in my thoughts any occurrence of special good fortune, I have enjoyed a perfect exhilaration. I am glad to the brink of fear.[br /]
[br /]

• Standing on the bare ground . . . all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eyeball; I am nothing; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or particle of God.[br /]
[br /]

• Give me health and a day, and I will make the pomp of emperors ridiculous.[br /]
[br /]

• Every natural fact is a symbol of some spiritual fact.[br /]
[br /]

• All that Adam had, all that Caesar could, you have and can do. Build, therefore, your own world.[br /]
[br /]

• The scholar is the delegated intellect. In the right state he is Man Thinking.[br /]
[br /]

• Meek young men grow up in libraries, believing it their duty to accept the views which Cicero, which Locke, which Bacon have given, forgetful that Cicero, Locke and Bacon were only young men in libraries when they wrote these books.[br /]
[br /]

• There is then creative reading as well as creative writing.[br /]
[br /]

• Character is higher than intellect.[br /]
[br /]

• In self-trust all the virtues are comprehended.[br /]
[br /]

• Wherever Macdonald sits, there is the head of the table.[br /]
[br /]

• I embrace the common, I explore and sit at the feet of the familiar, the low. Give me insight into today, and you may have the antique and future worlds. What would we really know the meaning of ? The meal in the firkin; the milk in the pan; the ballad in the street; the news of the boat.[br /]
[br /]

• If the single man plant himself indomitably on his instincts, and there abide, the huge world will come round to him.[br /]
[br /]

• If utterance is denied, the thought lies like a burden on the man. Always the seer is a sayer.[br /]
[br /]

• Men grind and grind in the mill of a truism, and nothing comes out but what was put in. But the moment they desert the tradition for a spontaneous thought, then poetry, wit, hope, virtue, learning, anecdote, all flock to their aid.[br /]
[br /]

• I have no expectation that any man will read history aright who thinks that what was done in a remote age, by men whose names have resounded far, has any deeper sense than what he is doing today.[br /]
[br /]

• We are always coming up with the emphatic facts of history in our private experience and verifying them here. All history becomes subjective; in other words, there is properly no history; only biography.[br /]
[br /]

• It is the fault of our rhetoric that we cannot strongly state one fact without seeming to belie some other.[br /]
[br /]

• Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members. The virtue in most request is conformity. Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.[br /]
[br /]

• It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.[br /]
[br /]

• An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man.[br /]
[br /]

• I like the silent church before the service begins, better than any preaching.[br /]
[br /]

• Discontent is the want of self-reliance: it is infirmity of will.[br /]
[br /]

• Every sweet hath its sour; every evil its good.[br /]
[br /]

• For everything you have missed, you have gained something else; and for everything you gain, you lose something.[br /]
[br /]

• Everything in Nature contains all the powers of Nature. Everything is made of one hidden stuff.[br /]
[br /]

• Thou art to me a delicious torment.[br /]
[br /]

• Almost all people descend to meet.[br /]
[br /]

• Happy is the house that shelters a friend.[br /]
[br /]

• A friend is a person with whom I may be sincere. Before him, I may think aloud.[br /]
[br /]

• A friend may well be reckoned the masterpiece of Nature.[br /]
[br /]

• Two may talk and one may hear, but three cannot take part in a conversation of the most sincere and searching sort.[br /]
[br /]

• I do then with my friends as I do with my books. I would have them where I can find them, but I seldom use them.[br /]
[br /]

• In skating over thin ice our safety is in our speed.[br /]
[br /]

• Heroism feels and never reasons and therefore is always right.[br /]
[br /]

• One man's justice is another's injustice; one man's beauty another's ugliness; one man's wisdom another's folly.[br /]
[br /]

• Nature abhors the old, and old age seems the only disease; all others run into this one.[br /]
[br /]

• Nothing astonishes men so much as common sense and plain dealing.[br /]
[br /]

• A man may love a paradox without either losing his wit or his honesty.[br /]
[br /]

• Literature is the effort of man to indemnify him self for the wrongs of his condition.[br /]
[br /]

• There is always a certain meanness in the argument of conservatism, joined with a certain superiority in its fact.[br /]
[br /]

• For it is not meters, but a metermaking argument that makes a poem a thought so passionate and alive that like the spirit of a plant or an animal it has an architecture of its own, and adorns nature with a new thing.[br /]
[br /]

• Language is the archives of history. . . . Language is fossil poetry.[br /]
[br /]

• Nature and books belong to the eyes that see them.[br /]
[br /]

• The less government we have, the better- the fewer laws, and the less confided power.[br /]
[br /]

• Every man is wanted, and no man is wanted much.[br /]
[br /]

• As to what are called the masses, and common men there are no common men. All men are at last of a size.[br /]
[br /]

• He is great who is what he is from Nature, and who never reminds us of others.[br /]
[br /]

• Great geniuses have the shortest biographies.[br /]
[br /]

• Things added to things, as statistics, civil history, are inventories. Things used as language are inexhaustibly attractive.[br /]
[br /]

• Keep cool it will be all one a hundred years hence.[br /]
[br /]

• Self-reliance, the height and perfection of man, is reliance on God.[br /]
[br /]

• Great men, great nations, have not been boasters and buffoons, but perceivers of the terror of life, and have manned themselves to face it.[br /]
[br /]

• Coal is a portable climate.[br /]
[br /]

• The world is his, who has money to go over it.[br /]
[br /]

• Art is a jealous mistress.[br /]
[br /]

• Solitude, the safeguard of mediocrity, is to genius the stern friend.[br /]
[br /]

• There is always a best way of doing everything, if it be to boil an egg. Manners are the happy ways of doing things.[br /]
[br /]

• Fine manners need the support of fine manners in others.[br /]
[br /]

• Shallow men believe in luck.[br /]
[br /]

• I wish that life should not be cheap, but sacred. I wish the days to be as centuries, loaded, fragrant.[br /]
[br /]

• Make yourself necessary to somebody.[br /]
[br /]

• Beauty without grace is the hook without the bait.[br /]
[br /]

• Never read any book that is not a year old.[br /]
[br /]

• There are always two parties, the party of the Past and the party of the Future; the Establishment and the Movement.[br /]
[br /]

• The key to the period appeared to be that the mind had become aware of itself. The young men were born with knives in their brain, a tendency to introversion, self-dissection, anatomizing of motives.[br /]
[br /]

• The true test of civilization is, not the census, nor the size of cities, nor the crops no, but the kind of man the country turns out.[br /]
[br /]

• Every genuine work of art has as much reason for being as the earth and the sun.[br /]
[br /]

• A masterpiece of art has in the mind a fixed place in the chain of being, as much as a plant or a crystal.[br /]
[br /]

• The best university that can be recommended to a man of ideas is the gauntlet of the mobs.[br /]
[br /]

• The ornament of a house is the friends who frequent it.[br /]
[br /]

• Can anybody remember when the times were not hard and money not scarce ?[br /]
[br /]

• Tis the good reader that makes the good book; . . . in every book he finds passages which seem confidences or asides hidden from all else and unmistakably meant for his ear.[br /]
[br /]

• We do not count a man's years until he has nothing else to count.[br /]
[br /]

• A mollusk is a cheap edition (of man) with a suppression of the costlier illustrations, designed for dingy circulation, for shelving in an oyster-bank or among the seaweed.[br /]
[br /]

• Life is not so short but that there is always time enough for courtesy.[br /]
[br /]

• I have heard with admiring submission the experience of the lady who declared that the sense of being perfectly well-dressed gives a feeling of inward tranquillity which religion is powerless to bestow.[br /]
[br /]

• Great men are they who see that spiritual is stronger than any material force, that thoughts rule the world.[br /]
[br /]

• When Shakespeare is charged with debts to his authors, Landor replies, Yet he was more original than his originals. He breathed upon dead bodies and brought them into life.[br /]
[br /]

• Wit makes its own welcome, and levels all distinctions.[br /]
[br /]

• The perception of the comic is a tie of sympathy with other men.[br /]
[br /]

• What is a weed ? A plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered.[br /]
[br /]

• Speak the affirmative; emphasize your choice by utter ignoring of all that you reject.[br /]
[br /]

• Genius has no taste for weaving sand.[br /]
[br /]

• This world we live in is but thickened light.[br /]
[br /]

• All the thoughts of a turtle are turtles, and of a rabbit, rabbits.[br /]
[br /]

• When you strike at a king, you must kill him.[br /]
[br /]

• When I discover who I am, I'll be free.[br /]
[br /]

• All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the absence of power.[br /]
[br /]

• Every man I meet is in some way my superior.[br /]
[br /]

• Every man is a divinity in disguise, a god playing the fool.[br /]
[br /]

• Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.[br /]
[br /]

• People only see what they are prepared to see.[br /]
[br /]

• So of cheerfulness, or a good temper, the more it is spent, the more it remains.[br /]
[br /]

• The wise through excess of wisdom is made a fool.[br /]
[br /]

• The world is all gates, all opportunities, strings of tension waiting to be struck.[br /]
[br /]

• All violence, all that is dreary and repels, is not power, but the absence of power.[br /]
[br /]

• Every man I meet is in some way my superior.[br /]
[br /]

• Every man is a divinity in disguise, a god playing the fool.[br /]
[br /]

• Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.[br /]
[br /]

• No man can get through me but through my act.[br /]
[br /]

• Nor knowest thou what argument[br /]

Thy life to thy neighbor's creed has lent.[br /]

All are needed by each one; [br /]

Nothing is fair or good alone.[br /]
[br /]

• I wiped away the weeds and foam, [br /]

I fetched my sea-born treasures home;[br /]

But the poor, unsightly, noisome things [br /]

Had left their beauty on the shore, [br /]

With the sun and the sand and the wild uproar.[br /]
[br /]

• Not from a vain or shallow thought [br /]

His awful Jove young Phidias brought.[br /]
[br /]

• Out from the heart of Nature rolled[br /]

The burdens of the Bible old.[br /]
[br /]

• The hand that rounded Peter's dome,[br /]

And groined the aisles of Christian Rome, [br /]

Wrought in a sad sincerity; [br /]

Himself from God he could not free; [br /]

He builded better than he knew: [br /]

The conscious stone to beauty grew.[br /]
[br /]

• Earth proudly wears the Parthenon [br /]

As the best gem upon her zone.[br /]
[br /]

• Earth laughs in flowers to see her boastful boys[br /]

Earth-proud, proud of the earth which is not theirs;[br /]

Who steer the plough, but cannot steer their feet [br /]

Clear of the grave.[br /]
[br /]

• Good bye, proud world! I'm going home; [br /]

Thou art not my friend, and I'm not thine.[br /]
[br /]

• For what are they all in their high conceit,[br /]

When man in the bush with God may meet ?[br /]
[br /]

• If eyes were made for seeing,[br /]

Then Beauty is its own excuse for being.[br /]
[br /]

• Olympian bards who sung [br /]

Divine ideas below,[br /]

Which always find us young[br /]

And always keep us so.[br /]
[br /]

• Heartily know,[br /]

When half-gods go,[br /]

The gods arrive.[br /]
[br /]

• Love not the flower they pluck and know it not,[br /]

And all their botany is Latin names.[br /]
[br /]

• The silent organ loudest chants [br /]

The master's requiem.[br /]
[br /]

• By the rude bridge that arched the flood,[br /]

Their flag to April's breeze unfurled, [br /]

Here once the embattl'd farmers stood, [br /]

And fired the shot heard round the world.[br /]
[br /]

• What potent blood hath modest May ![br /]
[br /]

• And striving to be man, the worm [br /]

Mounts through all the spires of form.[br /]
[br /]

• And every man, in love or pride,[br /]

Of his fate is never wide.[br /]
[br /]

• None shall rule but the humble,[br /]

And none but Toil shall have.[br /]
[br /]

• Oh, tenderly the haughty day [br /]

Fills his blue urn with fire.[br /]
[br /]

• Go put your creed into your deed, [br /]

Nor speak with double tongue.[br /]
[br /]

• So nigh is grandeur to our dust, [br /]

So near is God to man, [br /]

When Duty whispers low, Thou must, [br /]

The youth replies, I can ![br /]
[br /]

• Whoever fights, whoever falls,[br /]

Justice conquers evermore.[br /]
[br /]

• Nor sequent centuries could hit [br /]

Orbit and sum of Shakespeare's wit.[br /]
[br /]

• Born for success he seemed, [br /]

With grace to win, with heart to hold, [br /]

With shining gifts that took all eyes.[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

[b]BORN [/b]:[br /]

In Boston, Massachusetts, 1803.[br /]
[br /]

[b]EDUCATION [/b]:[br /]
[br /]


• Graduated from Harvard University at age 18.[br /]

• In 1825, he went to the Harvard Divinity School.[br /]
[br /]

[b]FAMILY[/b]:[br /]

Married Ellen Tucker and she died 17 months later.[br /]
[br /]

[b]As a writer[/b] :[br /]

Emerson went to Europe and met many British writers and poets. He came back from Europe in 1833, and settled in Concord, Massachusetts. He lectured in Boston. Addresses such as "Human Culture" and "The Present Age" were from his Journals (1909-1914). His Journals were a collection of notes and things from his education at Harvard. As he began to write more and more, his philosophies of life opposed the popular Calvinistic views. His Nature book, the first published, showed his idea of a Transcendental life (Transcendentalism). He applied his transcendentalistic thinkings to most of his works.[br /]
[br /]

[b]ESSAYS [/b]:[br /]

His first volume of essays was released in 1841 and includes the majority of his most popular works. A few of these being "Self-Reliance", "Prudence", "Heroism", and "Art". The second sequence of essays consisted of "The Poet", "Manners", and a few more.[br /]
[br /]


[b]LECTURES [/b]:[br /]

In 1847 to 1848, Emerson lectured in England again. Some of the lectures he gave were put together in a collaborative volume called Representative Men (1850). This collection contains essays about famous figures such as Plato and other philosophers and writers.[br /]
[br /]

[b]OTHER WORKS[/b] :[br /]

One of Ralph Waldo Emerson's most quickly popularized books was The Conduct of Life, produced in 1860. In this series of essays were essays like "Power", "Fate", and "Culture". The Conduct of Life gives the reader a good idea on Emerson's philosophy the world and what can happen with power and money. It is really stimulating !
Emerson also wrote poems. A collection called May Day and Other Pieces, written in 1867, was Emerson's last piece of work before he slowed down. He stopped writing for a duration of time. His mental capabilities went downhill and eventually many years later he wrote Society and Solitude in 1870 and Parnassus (1874), another masterpiece of his poetic works. Sadly, the great philosopher and writer died in 1882.[br /]
[br /]

[b]PEARLS OF POEMS :[/b][br /]
[br /]

[b]What is Success ?[/b][br /]
[br /]

To laugh often and much; [br /]
To win the respect of intelligent people[br /]

and the affection of children;[br /]

To earn the appreciation of honest critics[br /]

and endure the betrayal of false friends;[br /]

To appreciate beauty;[br /]

To find the best in others;[br /]

To leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition;[br /]

To know even one life has breathed [br /]

easier because you have lived;[br /]
[br /]

[b]Brahma[/b][br /]
[br /]

"If the red slayer think he slays, [br /]

Or if the slain think he is slain,[br /]

They know not well the subtle ways[br /]

I keep, and pass, and turn again.[br /]

Far or forgot to me is near; [br /]

Shadow and sunlight are the same;[br /]

The vanished gods to me appear; [br /]

And one to me are shame and fame.[br /]

They reckon ill who leave me out; [br /]

When me they fly, I am the wings; [br /]

I am the doubter and the doubt, [br /]

I am the hymn the Brahmin sings.[br /]

The strong gods pine for my abode,[br /]

And pine in vain the sacred Seven;[br /]

But thou, meek lover of the good! [br /]

Find me, and turn thy back on heaven."[br /]
[br /]
[br /]

Comments - Ralph Emerson